Upcoming News & Events

Wakefield, MA – (May 10, 2017)HD Physical Therapy announces that May 14, 2017will mark the company's 5th anniversary! They are hosting an open house celebration on Friday, May 19th to mark the milestone occasion.

In May of 2012, HDPT co-founders Ed Harding, PTA and Glenn D’Addario, MSPT, DPT, set out to create an exceptional place where they could help as many people as possible. Afterfive years, they are very proud and excited to be accomplishingjust that. Through diligence and dedication, their clinic has grown from the 3 staff members it opened with, to over 14 employees. They have been able to treatover 4200 patients. They have mentored approximately40high school and physical therapy students. They have made many appearances at area health fairs, high schools, colleges and community events, as well as contributed to numerous charitiesand their events. In 2013, they received national recognition for theiroverall success by winning ADVANCE Magazine’s “Best PT Practice 2013” silver medal, and in 2015 they were named the Wakefield Lynnfield Chamber of Commerce Business of the Year. In response to their growth, they have expanded their original office space and areable to treat more patients, more efficiently, plus provide a more pleasant and advantageous environment for their staff.

“We want to extend a heartfelt thank you to our referrers and advocates for helping make HDPT’s fifth, milestone year a continued success,” said CEO &co-founder Ed Harding. “Thank you for supporting our practice, for referring patients, for trusting and believing in us, and for giving HDPT such a positive community presence. As our practice continues to grow and expand, we know that we would not be where we are today without the continued encouragement of our friends and family, and for that we are infinitely grateful,” said Harding. “In the last 5 years, we have helped a lot of people, and have had a lot of fun doing it!”

Please join HDPT for their 5th Anniversary Open House Celebration on Friday, May 19th from 11am-6pm. The clinic is located at 607 North Ave., Door 16, Wakefield, MA. Stop in and say hello, have some food and fun, take a tour of the office, meet the current team and ask a PT any questions! Plus, make sure you enjoy a special treat - we’ll have our very own ice cream truck!!!! 

Wakefield, MA – (March 16, 2017)March isNational Multiple Sclerosis Education and Awareness Month! It is an effort by the Multiple Sclerosis Foundation (MSF) to raise the public's awareness of multiple sclerosis (MS). The vital goals of the campaign are to promote an understanding of the scope of the disease, and to assist those with MS in making educated decisions about their healthcare.

A diagnosis of MS does not necessarily mean that you will experience severe disability. MS is a disease of mobility, and physical therapy is indicated for the treatment of mobility deficits. A referral to physical therapy should come as early as possible in the course of the disease, before deficits can become disabling. With proper medical and physical therapy management, MS is viewed as a disease that can be managed over a lifetime.

The mobility deficits that are most often seen in MS patients are multifactorial. Loss of strength, range of motion, endurance, gait and balance occur as a result of a complex assortment of interacting factors. Physical therapists are uniquely trained to evaluate, assess and treat all of these mobility deficits.

Physical therapists can help many MS patients with their primary and their secondary symptoms. A primary symptommay be experiencing a lack of coordination, having involuntary movements or resisting movement (spasticity). Primary symptoms can gradually make you inactive, therefore leading to secondary symptoms, such asfeeling tired, and experiencing tightness, pain and weakness, especially in the muscles and joints.

“Physical therapy cannot cure primary MS symptoms; at this time, neurological damage cannot be reversed. However, PT can bevery helpful inteaching compensatorybehaviors. These techniquescan enable you to counteract the physical changes brought on by MS. Theyinclude learning new movement practices, strategies and equipment,” says HDPT co-founder and president, Dr. Glenn D’Addario, MSPT. “The right therapy can also be very helpful withdecreasing the secondary symptoms of MS. A trained physical therapist can teach you exercises you can use to strengthen and stretch muscles, while maintaining stability and mobility.This can improve your independence and quality of life, plus help relieve pain.”

Wakefield, MA – (February 21, 2017)Heart disease is the leading cause of death for American women and men, accounting for 1 in 4 deaths in the United States. Nearly half of Americans have at least one risk factor for heart disease, such as high blood pressure, obesity, physical inactivity or an unhealthy diet. Risk also increases with age.

The good news is that individuals of all ages can reduce their risk for heart disease by making lifestyle changes and managing medical conditions through appropriate treatment plans. With a record number of young adults living at home or in close contact with older relatives, they have a golden opportunity to encourage parents and other family members to make heart-healthy changes and offer support along the way.

That’s why, for American Heart Month 2017, Million Hearts® is calling on younger Americans to spread prevention messages. We believe young adults have the power to engage their parents in crucial conversations about heart disease prevention that can result in heart-healthy behavior changes.

How can you make a difference?

  • Find a time to talk. Talking with your loved ones about heart disease can be awkward, but it’s important. In fact, it could save a life. At the dinner table, in the car, or even via text, have a heart-to-heart with your loved ones about improving heart health as a family.
  • Encourage healthy eating habits. Even small changes can make a big difference. Suggest making healthier versions of your favorite family recipes. Look up new recipes, then accompany your loved ones on a grocery store run. Help them choose items low in sodium, added sugar, and trans fats, and make sure they stock up on fresh fruits and vegetables.
  • Promote physical activity. Encourage your family members to aim for at least 150 minutes of physical activity per week. Offer to join them for a walk, bring them to an exercise class, or challenge the whole family to a friendly fitness competition.
  • Show support. Someone who feels supported is more likely to quit smoking. Have a heart-to-heart with your loved ones about tobacco use.
  • Check in on health care. Remind family members to get their blood pressure and cholesterol levels checked regularly by a health care provider. Are they already on medication to control their risk factors? Help family members set up a reminder system using a phone app or pillbox.

Changing your lifestyle can seem overwhelming, even when you know to make only one or two changes at a time. It can be especially difficult to determine how to get started, or which change to make first. If you need more help getting started, you may benefit from working with a licensed physical therapist. Studies show that physical therapy practices are excellent avenues for promoting a physically active lifestyle and could potentially play an important public health role.With Direct Access (which means a person can visit a physical therapist directly, without a referral, to seek a personalized health evaluation), more and more people are using physical therapy for preventative care to help them stay healthy.

But, before getting started, you should always speak to your doctor before you change, start or stop any part of your healthcare plan, including physical activity or exercise. Reading health and exercise information online may be helpful, but it cannot replace the professional diagnosis and treatment you might need from a qualified healthcare professional.

Million Hearts® is a national initiative with an ambitious goal to prevent 1 million heart attacks and strokes in 2017. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services co-lead the initiative on behalf of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

Wakefield, MA – (January 10, 2017)Wakefield/Rotary District 7930 is holding its 7th Annual Polar Plunge on Saturday, February 4th, at 11:15am, on Long Beach in Gloucester, right in front of the Cape Ann Motor Inn.

This year's TEAM HDPT plungers include Wakefield Rotary Club Board member and HDPT co-founder Ed Harding, PTA, along with HDPT co-founder Glenn D'Addario, MSPT, DPT, and staff members, Svet Wilson, PTA, ATC, Robbie Barletta, PTA, Sean Flaherty, PT, OCS, Steve Sheridan, MSPT, Chris Foster, Dan McCallum, Ashley Aldred and Meaghan Colleran.We also have HDPT family membersDiarmuid Cahill and Courtney Bowen joining us!

Team captain Ed explains, “for as little as 60 cents worth of an oral vaccine, a child can be protected from this terrible disease for life. The plunge event is fun for everyone, but the real money we raise directly translates to thousands of vaccines. It is an amazing feeling to know that we have a hand in preventing a crippling disease from affecting children.”

After over 20 years of hard work, Rotary and its partners are on the brink of eradicating polio; a strong push is needed now to eliminate it once and for all. Donations directly support immunization campaigns in developing countries where polio continues to infect and paralyze children, robbing them of their futures and compounding the hardships faced by their families.

All proceeds benefit The Rotary Foundation’s End Polio Now Campaign. Plus, all gifts are matched 2:1 by the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation!

Visit us at: https://app.mobilecause.com/vf/polio/EdwardHarding to join our team & donate today!Friends & family are invited to register and plunge with us! All supporters are welcome on the beach; it’s always a fun event for families. 

Wakefield, MA – (November 22, 2016)– It’s Movember, the time of year when the mustache takes over the world for one month. Movember is the global men's health charity encouraging men to grow, and women to support, the moustache for the 30 days of November. Through the power of the moustache, Movember participants and partners raise funds and awareness for men’s health.

HDPT’s co-founding partners, Ed Harding, PTA and Glenn D’Addario, MSPT, DPT, along with staff members Sean Flaherty, PT, OCS, Steve Sheridan, MSPT, Svet Wilson, PTA, ATC, Robbie Barletta, PTA, Dan McCallum and Chris Foster are joining the cause for the 5th year in a row. The eight men began the month clean-shaven, and are documenting their growth journey on Facebook, Twitter, Google+, Instagramand ontheirown HDPT blog.

Why is Movember so important? One of the biggest obstacles men tackle in regards to their health is a reluctance to discuss issues they face either with their partner, family or doctor. Movember was born from the understanding that a fun and engaging initiative could help encourage men to become more actively involved in their own health. Movember aims to increase awareness and support for men's health by getting conversations started, at a grassroots level, educating men about the health risks they face, and raising vital funds for support programs.

“After 5 years, thissilly moustache continues to be an iconic way to encourage dialogue about men’s health issues,” said HDPT president & co-founder Glenn R. D’Addario, MSPT, DPT. “We are happy to have our moustaches be the catalyst for these conversations and to continue to help generate funds that will deliver breakthrough research and support services allowing men to live longer, healthier, happier lives.”

Since 2003, millions have joined the Movember Foundation’s men’s health movement, raising more than $710 million and funding over 1200 breakthrough programs through impact investments, focusing on prostate cancer, testicular cancer, poor mental health and physical inactivity.

To participate, follow HDPT’s photos on Facebook, Twitter, Google+, Instagram and on theirblog, join the HDPT Movember team online, spread the word, donate to the cause and grow a MOUSTACHE. Find team HDPT at: http://moteam.co/hdpt. The moustache is our hairy ribbon, our symbol for change.

Wakefield, MA – (October 11, 2016) – National Physical Therapy Month is celebrated each October to recognize how physical therapists and physical therapist assistants help transform society by restoring and improving motion in people's lives. This October, HD Physical Therapy is recognizing National PT Month by helping to debunk 7 of the most common myths about physical therapy.

People everywhere are experiencing the transformative effect physical therapy can have on their daily lives. In fact, as experts in the way the body moves, physical therapists help people of all ages and abilities reduce pain, improve or restore mobility, and stay active and fit throughout life. But there are some common misconceptions that often discourage people from visiting a physical therapist.

7 common myths about physical therapy:

1. Myth: I need a referral to see a physical therapist.

Fact: A recent survey by the American Physical Therapy Association (APTA) revealed 70% of people think a referral or prescription is required for evaluation by a physical therapist. However, all 50 states and the District of Columbia (DC) allow patients to be evaluated by a physical therapist without a physician's prior referral. In addition, 48 states and DC allow for some form of treatment or intervention without a physician referral or prescription. This is called Direct Access.

2. Myth: Physical therapy is painful.

Fact: Physical therapists seek to minimize your pain and discomfort—including chronic or long-term pain. They work within your pain threshold to help you heal, and restore movement and function. The survey found that although 71% of people who have never visited a physical therapist think physical therapy is painful, that number significantly decreases among patients who have seen a physical therapist in the past year.

3. Myth: Physical therapy is only for injuries and accidents.

Fact: Physical therapists do a lot more than just stretch or strengthen weak muscles after an injury or surgery. They are skilled at evaluating and diagnosing potential problems before they lead to more serious injuries or disabling conditions—from carpal tunnel syndrome and frozen shoulder, to chronic headaches and lower back pain, to name a few.

4. Myth: Any health care professional can perform physical therapy.

Fact: Although 42% of consumers know that physical therapy can only be performed by a licensed physical therapist, 37% still believe other health care professionals can also administer physical therapy. Many physical therapists also pursue board certification in specific areas such as neurology, orthopedics, sports, or women’s health, for example.

5. Myth: Physical therapy isn't covered by insurance.

Fact: Most insurance policies cover some form of physical therapy. Beyond insurance coverage, physical therapy has proven to reduce costs by helping people avoid unnecessary imaging scans, surgery, or prescription drugs. Physical therapy can also lower costs by helping patients avoid falls or by addressing conditions before they become chronic.

6. Myth: Surgery is my only option.

Fact: In many cases, physical therapy has been shown to be as effective as surgery in treating a wide range of conditions—from rotator cuff tears and degenerative disk disease, to meniscal tears and some forms of knee osteoarthritis. Those who have recently seen a physical therapist know this to be true, with 79% believing physical therapy can provide an alternative to surgery.

7. Myth: I can do physical therapy myself.

Fact: Your participation is key to a successful treatment plan, but every patient still needs the expert care and guidance of a licensed physical therapist. Your therapist will leverage his or her specialized education, clinical expertise, and the latest available evidence to evaluate your needs and make a diagnosis before creating an individualized plan of care.

Wakefield, MA – (September 20, 2016) – HD Physical Therapy celebrates National Rehabilitation Awareness Week, September 18-24.

Since 1976, the mission of National Rehabilitation Awareness Week is to be a nationwide celebration that helps educate people about the benefits and impact of rehabilitation, develops programs that increases opportunities for the over fifty million Americans with disabilities, and helps those who are disabled live up to their fullest potential.

Disability is the consequence of an impairment that may be physical, cognitive, mental, sensory, emotional, developmental, or some combination of these. Some estimates suggest that 10% of the world's population has some form of disability. That number will grow significantly over the next 20 years as the baby-boomer generation enters later life, when the risk of disability is greatest. The field of physical therapy is central to ensuring an optimal future for people with disability across the globe.

Most people share the desire to be as well, mobile, independent and pain free as possible. Physical therapists are highly trained and licensed health care professionals who diagnose and manage individuals of all ages, who have medical problems or other health-related conditions that limit their abilities to move and perform functional activities in their daily lives. Physical therapists examine each individual, develop a plan of care, and use treatment techniques to promote the ability to move, reduce pain, restore function and prevent, or work to improve, disability. Physical therapists also work with individuals to prevent injury and the loss of mobility by developing fitness- and wellness-oriented programs for healthier and more active lifestyles. Plus, Massachusetts allows for Direct Access to a physical therapist. Direct Access means that you are able to refer yourself to a physical therapist without having to see any other doctor first.

If you are still unsure about what physical therapy can do for you, your friends, or your family, kindly visit or call the office and our experienced staff will guide you and answer any questions that you may have.

Wakefield, MA – (June 28, 2016) June is National Migraine & Headache Awareness Month. Over 37 million people in the U.S. are diagnosed with migraines. Although 47% of the adult population experience headaches annually, these disorders are poorly recognized and inadequately treated. In 2016, the National Headache Foundation is encouraging headache sufferers to be engaged in the management of their headaches and “Rule Your Headache,” with an additional message encouraging us all to be actively engaged in our treatment, a primary way to rule our disorders.

To "rule" our headache disorders, we have to take charge of our health and health care and "be actively engaged" in our own treatment. That means:

  • continuing to learn
  • getting ourselves to a doctor who understands migraine and is willing to answer questions and work with us
  • working with our doctors as treatment partners
  • talking with our doctors about lifestyle modifications that can help with our migraine management, then actually making modifications
  • insisting that our doctors review all the options, then make decisions WITH us rather than FOR us.

So where does physical therapy fit into the management of migraine headaches? The answer depends on the individual headache sufferer, as there is a wide range of clinical presentations in patients with migraine headaches. Physical therapy primarily involves work on the muscles and joints in the peripheral system. This means how an individual migraine sufferer responds to physical therapy depends partly on the extent to which the muscles and joints are involved in their headaches. The goals of physical therapy treatment are generally to normalize the musculoskeletal system as much as possible in order to reduce stress and tension on the soft tissues and joints. At HD Physical Therapy, we work individually with our migraine patients on the best ways to utilize modalities such as ice and relaxation, stretches and exercise, and manual and massage techniques. 

Wakefield, MA – (May 23, 2016) HD Physical Therapy announced that Saturday, May 14 marked the company's 4th anniversary, and that they also welcomed a new team member!

In May of 2012, HDPT co-founders Ed Harding, PTA and Glenn D’Addario, MSPT, DPT, set out to create an exceptional place where they could help as many people as possible. After four years, they are very proud and excited to be accomplishing just that. Through diligence and dedication, their clinic has grown from the 3 staff members it opened with to over 13 employees. They have been able to treat over 2275 patients. They have mentored approximately 30 high school and physical therapy students. They have made various appearances at area health fairs, high schools and community events, as well as contributed to numerous charities as well as participated in their events. In 2013, they received national recognition for their overall success by winning ADVANCE Magazine’s “Best PT Practice 2013” silver medal, and in 2015 they were named the Wakefield Lynnfield Chamber of Commerce Business of the Year. In response to their growth, they expanded their original office space and are able to treat more patients, more efficiently, plus provide a more pleasant and advantageous environment for their staff.

“We want to extend a heartfelt thank you to our referrers and advocates for helping make HDPT’s fourth year a continued success,” said CEO & co-founder Ed Harding. “Thank you for supporting our practice, for referring patients, for trusting and believing in us, and for giving HDPT such a positive community presence. As our practice continues to grow and expand, we know that we would not be where we are today without the continued encouragement of our friends and family, and for that we are infinitely grateful,” said Harding.

Also this May, HD Physical Therapy is excited to announce a new team member; Stephen Sheridan, MSPT has joined HDPT. “We welcome Steve to the HDPT family. The experience and clinical knowledge he brings is outstanding. We are confident that he will immediately increase our ability to provide better care to even more people,” says Glenn R. D’Addario, MSPT, DPT, President & co-founder of HD Physical Therapy. “I am looking forward to working with Steve, and to seeing how much further we can grow HDPT all together.”

Mr. Sheridan has over 15 years of clinical experience as a physical therapist in the orthopedic setting. With this experience, and extensive training, he utilizes his expert diagnostic abilities and manual therapy skills to provide the highest quality of care for his patients, maximizing their outcomes. Steve treats each patient as an individual. By doing so, he is able to tailor a specific treatment approach targeting what each patient needs in order to reach their best possible outcome, resume all of their functional goals and get them back to what they love to do.

Wakefield, MA – (April 26, 2016) Spring is here and that means warmer weather and spring sports. Though playing sports is a great way for your child to stay fit and healthy, learn about teamwork, make friends, and develop a sense of personal satisfaction, playing sports can also lead to injuries if not carefully monitored.

According to Safe Kids Worldwide, more than 38 million children and adolescents participate in sports each year in the U.S., and more than 3.5 million of those aged 14 and under receive medical treatment for sports injuries. To help promote sports safety and help prevent injury, HD Physical Therapy recognizes April as National Youth Sports Safety Month.

Some of the most common sports-related injuries for children include sprains, muscle strains, bone or growth plate injuries, repetitive motion injuries and heat-related illness.  Youth sports injuries may be caused by many factors, including: medical conditions, inadequate physical exams before play, lack of pre-season conditioning, improper equipment, unsafe playing fields/surfaces, improper training or coaching, not warming up, cooling down and stretching properly, playing while actually injured and poor nutrition, hydration or temperature control. However, most sports injuries can be prevented with smart habits and good training for players, coaches and parents.

To further help prevent sport injuries, or to treat an injury that has occurred, many children also visit a physical therapist. Your physical therapist can take on many roles—confidante, educator, healer, and in many cases, mediator between a parent and athlete or coach. Parents want their children to be healthy, happy and successful. Kids tend to want to continue playing and not worry about their injury.

“We treat sports injuries in kids of all ages, whether they occur during a high school game, or while playing in the backyard. However, our job is to remind kids that this is youth sports—it’s about learning lifelong lessons about teamwork, having fun and remaining in good health,” says HD Physical Therapy CEO, Ed Harding, PTA. “It’s important to stress that the lifelong risks of ignoring our recommendations far outweigh the short-term benefits of winning a game. Overuse injuries, for example, especially in younger athletes, have long-term consequences that parents and athletes need to recognize. It is important to stress rest and recovery for future success, both on and off the field. “ 

Wakefield, MA – (March 22, 2016) “A Safer Approach to Work, Life and Sport,” is the theme of this year’s National Athletic Training Month, which is sponsored by the National Athletic Trainers’ Association (NATA), a not-for-profit organization based in Dallas, Texas.

Athletic Trainers (ATs) are licensed and certified health care professionals who collaborate with physicians and physical therapists (PTs). The services provided by ATs comprise prevention, emergency care, clinical assessment, therapeutic intervention and rehabilitation of injuries and sports-related illness.

The PT and the AT can be critical partners on the rehabilitation team of injured athletes; many parts of an athlete’s rehabilitation can be done synergistically by both the clinical PT and the AT. Many PTs will take advantage of their relationship with an AT to help co-create a treatment plan that addresses each individual athlete’s specific needs.

At HD Physical Therapy, one of our therapists, Svet Wilson, PTA, ATC/L, is a licensed physical therapist assistant, as well as a licensed and certified athletic trainer. Combining his years of education and experience in both disciplines has allowed Svet to become an expert sports medicine clinician; he is highly skilled in preventing, recognizing, managing and rehabilitating injuries that result from athletics and other physical activity.

“For me, each field supports the other, and combining them creates the best possible scenario for the patient or athlete that I am working with,” said Wilson. “By merging the best of both worlds, people are given the highest quality of care, and achieve the best outcomes possible.”

Wakefield, MA – (February 24, 2016) Heart disease and stroke are the first and fifth leading causes of death in the United States. Every 43 seconds, someone in the United States has a heart attack, many of them fatal. On average, one American dies from stroke every 4 minutes. This February, during American Heart Month, Million Hearts® is challenging men to start one new, heart-healthy behavior. Heart disease is the leading cause of death for men, and African American men are disproportionately affected more by heart disease than other races or ethnicities.

Simple changes can make a big difference! Here are some ideas for getting started:

  • Talk to your doctor about ways to control high blood pressure
  • Make healthy eating swaps, including reducing salt intake
  • Quit smoking
  • Add physical activity to your daily routine.

Making regular physical activity part of your lifestyle is one of the most effective ways to improve your heart health. Physical activity can improve heart health by reducing high blood pressure, improving cholesterol levels, decreasing risk for stroke, controlling weight and obesity, helping to manage type 2 diabetes and limiting metabolic syndrome. Even for people who have heart disease, physical activity can result in a healthier and longer life.

If you want to improve your physical fitness, but you find the idea of exercise overwhelming, it may help you to know exercise and physical activity are not the same thing—yet both are beneficial to your health.

Exercise is a physical activity that is planned, structured, repetitive, and purposeful.  Physical activity includes any body movement that contracts your muscles to burn more calories than your body would normally do so just to exist at rest. Although learning to enjoy and plan structured exercise into your routine would definitely improve fitness, it is not the only way to improve fitness. Everyday physical activities such as performing housework, walking, or taking a hike keep your body moving and still count toward the recommended amount of weekly physical activity. 

However, changing your lifestyle can seem overwhelming, even when you know to make only one or two changes at a time. It can be especially difficult to determine how to get started, or which change to make first. If you need more help getting started, you may benefit from working with a licensed physical therapist. Studies show that physical therapy practices are excellent avenues for promoting a physically active lifestyle and could potentially play an important public health role. With Direct Access (which means a person can visit a physical therapist directly to seek a personalized health evaluation), more and more people are using physical therapy for preventative care to help them stay healthy.

But, before getting started, you should always speak to your doctor before you change, start or stop any part of your healthcare plan, including physical activity or exercise. Reading health and exercise information online may be helpful, but it cannot replace the professional diagnosis and treatment you might need from a qualified healthcare professional.

Million Hearts® is a national initiative with an ambitious goal to prevent 1 million heart attacks and strokes by 2017. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services co-lead the initiative on behalf of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

Wakefield, MA – (January 12, 2016) Wakefield/Rotary District 7930 is holding its 6th Annual Polar Plunge on Saturday, January 23, at 11:15am, on Long Beach in Gloucester, right in front of the Cape Ann Motor Inn.

This year's TEAM HDPT plungers include Wakefield Rotary Club Board member and HDPT co-founder Ed Harding, PTA, along with HDPT co-founder Glenn D'Addario, MSPT, DPT, and staff members, Svet Wilson, PTA, ATC, Robbie Barletta, PTA, Sean Flaherty, PT, OCS, Ryan Moore, Chris Foster, Lindsey Keane & Adrienne Stelmack. We also have HDPT family members Elliot Shea and Diarmuid Cahill joining us!

Team captain Ed explains, “for as little as 60 cents worth of an oral vaccine, a child can be protected from the disease for life. The plunge event is fun for everyone, but the real money we raise directly translates to thousands of vaccines. It is an amazing feeling to know that we have a hand in preventing a crippling disease from affecting children.”

After over 20 years of hard work, Rotary and its partners are on the brink of eradicating polio; a strong push is needed now to root it out once and for all. Donations directly support immunization campaigns in developing countries where polio continues to infect and paralyze children, robbing them of their futures and compounding the hardships faced by their families.

All proceeds benefit The Rotary Foundation’s End Polio Now Campaign. Plus, all gifts are matched 2:1 by the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation!

Text “Polio115” to 71777 or visit us at: https://app.mobilecause.com/vf/polio/edwardharding to join our team & donate today! Friends & family are invited to register and plunge with us! All supporters are welcome on the beach; it is a fun event for families. 

Wakefield, MA – (November 17, 2015) – It’s Movember, the time of year when the mustache takes over the world for one month. Movember is the global men's health charity encouraging men to grow, and women to support, the moustache for the 30 days of November. Through the power of the moustache, Movember participants and partners raise funds and awareness for men’s health. This year, men and women can also participate by signing up to MOVE, the Movember Foundation’s 30-day fitness challenge that invites participants to carry out 30 physical activities in 30 days.

HDPT’s co-founding partners, Ed Harding, PTA and Glenn D’Addario, MSPT, DPT, along with staff members Sean Flaherty, PT, OCS, Svet Wilson, PTA, ATC, Robbie Barletta, PTA, Ryan Moore and Chris Foster are joining the cause for the 4th year in a row. The men began the month clean-shaven, and will be documenting their growth journey on Facebook, Twitter, Google+, Instagram and on their own HDPT blog.

Why is Movember so important? One of the biggest obstacles men tackle in regards to their health is a reluctance to discuss issues they face either with their partner, family or doctor. Movember was born from the understanding that a fun and engaging initiative could help encourage men to become more actively involved in their own health. Movember aims to increase awareness and support for men's health by getting conversations started, at a grassroots level, educating men about the health risks they face, and raising vital funds for support programs.

“This moustache continues to be an iconic way to encourage dialogue about men’s health issues,” said HDPT president & co-founder Glenn R. D’Addario, MSPT, DPT. “We are excited to have our moustaches be the catalyst for these conversations and help generate funds that will deliver breakthrough research and support services allowing men to live longer, healthier, happier lives.”

Since 2003, millions have joined the Movember Foundation’s men’s health movement, raising more than $650 million and funding over 1,000 programs through impact investments, focusing on prostate cancer, testicular cancer, poor mental health and physical inactivity.

To participate, follow HDPT’s photos on Facebook, Twitter, Google+, Instagram and on their blog, join the HDPT Movember team online, spread the word, donate to the cause, MOVE and grow a MOUSTACHE. Find team HDPT at: http://moteam.co/hdpt. The moustache is our hairy ribbon, our symbol for change.



Wakefield, MA – (October 21, 2015) –
National Physical Therapy Month is celebrated each October to recognize how physical therapists and physical therapist assistants help transform society by restoring and improving motion in people's lives. However, transforming lives does not stop at the clinic, we also reach out to our communities and look for ways to give back. This October, HD Physical Therapy was thrilled to recognize National PT Month by participating in a new, comprehensive movement called “Global PT Day of Service,” on Saturday, October 17th.

Global PT Day of Service (PTDOS) began as a thought that, what if, on the same day, clinicians, students and associated staff of the physical therapy profession volunteered in different communities all around the world? What if, they then shared those moments and acts in a way that was galvanizing, inspiring and promoted connections all over the world? PTDOS would give the physical therapy community the unique chance to unite and contribute to something that would impact the lives of everyone involved. 

HD Physical Therapy chose the Floating Hospital for Children at Tufts Medical Center in Boston as our service site, working closely with Andrea Pappaconstantinou, the Director of Child Life Services. Our main purpose was to give back, and Floating Hospital was a perfect fit. In 2009, Ed’s triplets were born there at 25 weeks gestation; they were all micro preemies weighing under 2lbs. each. The hospital cared for them for the following 5 years, providing not only expert medical care, but also endless amounts of support and resources. It was only fitting that we gave back to the team that had given the Harding family so much.

On Saturday the 17th, the HD Physical Therapy family joined together and brought toys, books, puzzles and games to Ace’s Place, the hospital’s patient play room. We delivered balloons to all of the inpatient kids at the hospital. Plus, we gave stuffed animals and small mirrors to the NICU patients and families. The mirrors assist the families of the NICU babies with kangarooing. Kangaroo care is the practice of holding a diapered baby on your bare chest. This skin-to-skin contact helps babies thrive because they are comforted by your familiar scent, touch, and the rhythms of your speech and of your breathing. However, when the baby is lying on your chest, you cannot see their face. So, the mirrors allow parents to hold their babies close, yet still see their faces and expressions in the mirror.

“Global PT Day of Service provided an amazing opportunity for my immediate family and my HDPT family to join together and give back to the Floating Hospital. All of the doctors, nurses, therapists and staff members there were fundamental in helping my children reach every milestone. It was extremely rewarding to be able to go back there and say ‘thank you’ again,” said Ed Harding, PTA, HD Physical Therapy’s co-founder and CEO. “It was a meaningful day for all of us.”

Wakefield, MA – (September 22, 2015) – HD Physical Therapy celebrates National Rehabilitation Awareness Week, September 20-26.

Since 1976, the mission of National Rehabilitation Awareness Week is to be a nationwide celebration that helps educate people about the benefits and impact of rehabilitation, develops programs that increases opportunities for the over fifty million Americans with disabilities, and helps those who are disabled live up to their fullest potential.

Disability is the consequence of an impairment that may be physical, cognitive, mental, sensory, emotional, developmental, or some combination of these. Some estimates suggest that 10% of the world's population has some form of disability. That number will grow significantly over the next 20 years as the baby-boomer generation enters later life, when the risk of disability is greatest. The field of physical therapy is central to ensuring an optimal future for people with disability across the globe.

Most people share the desire to be as well, mobile, independent and pain free as possible. Physical therapists are highly trained and licensed health care professionals who diagnose and manage individuals of all ages, who have medical problems or other health-related conditions that limit their abilities to move and perform functional activities in their daily lives. Physical therapists examine each individual, develop a plan of care, and use treatment techniques to promote the ability to move, reduce pain, restore function and prevent, or work to improve, disability. Physical therapists also work with individuals to prevent injury and the loss of mobility by developing fitness- and wellness-oriented programs for healthier and more active lifestyles. Plus, Massachusetts allows for Direct Access to a physical therapist. Direct Access means that you are able to refer yourself to a physical therapist without having to see any other doctor first.

If you are still unsure about what physical therapy can do for you, your friends, or your family, kindly visit or call the office and our experienced staff will guide you and answer any questions that you may have.

Wakefield, MA (August 25, 2015) — For millions of children, the return to school also means a return to organized sports. Whatever they are playing, the American Association of Neurological Surgeons (AANS), along with HD Physical Therapy (HDPT), continues to stress the importance of concussion awareness and prevention. It is important that children, parents, coaches and administrators all take the proper precautions, and are aware of the potentially devastating effects that head and spinal cord injuries can have when participating in sports. Anyone involved in youth sports must make concussion awareness a part of their practice this August, which is Neurosurgery Outreach Month.

As many as 3.8 million sports and recreation-related concussions occur in the United States each year. A concussion is an injury that changes how the cells in the brain normally work. Concussions are caused by a hit to the head, and even the body, that forces the brain to move rapidly inside the skull. It does not have to be caused by player-on-player contact, as concussions can result from collisions with the ground, ice or other obstacles.

To recognize a potential concussion:

  • Watch for a hit or blow to the head, or body, that creates a rapid movement of the head.
  • Pay attention to any change in the athlete’s behavior, awareness, thinking, or functioning of the body. If there appears to be any behavioral change in a player, be sure to take the player out of the game and have him/her examined thoroughly. 

Some potential symptoms that players should be aware of, include: Headache • Confusion • Difficulty remembering or paying attention • Balance problems or dizziness • Feeling sluggish, hazy, foggy, or groggy • Feeling irritable, more emotional, or “down” • Nausea or vomiting • Bothered by light or noise • Double or blurry vision • Slowed reaction time • Sleep problems • Loss of consciousness.

However, as with most injuries, preventing concussions is ideal. Buy and use helmets or protective headgear approved by the American Society for Testing Materials International (ASTM) for each specific sport, 100 percent of the time. The ASTM has vigorous standards for testing helmets for many sports; helmets approved by the ASTM bear a sticker stating this. Helmets and headgear come in many sizes and styles for many sports, and must properly fit to provide maximum protection against head injuries. In addition to other safety apparel or gear, helmets or headgear should be worn at all times for:

  • Baseball and Softball (when batting)
  • Cycling
  • Football
  • Hockey
  • Horseback Riding
  • Inline Skating
  • Powered Recreational Vehicles
  • Skateboards/Scooters
  • Skiing/Snowboarding
  • Wrestling

“Concussion awareness, knowing how to prevent them, plus understanding the signs and symptoms of a potential concussion or other traumatic brain injury, is critically important in all sports,” says Ed Harding, PTA, co-founder of HD Physical Therapy. “Helping to educate the public, especially during August and Neurosurgery Outreach Month, is one of the best weapons we have when it comes to combating these types of injuries.”

Wakefield, MA – (July 14, 2015) July is Juvenile Arthritis Awareness Month. Juvenile Arthritis (JA) is one of the most common diseases in children, with almost 300,000 in the United States diagnosed. Arthritis is a complex family of musculoskeletal disorders consisting of more than 100 different diseases or conditions that destroy joints, bones, muscles, cartilage and other connective tissues. Juvenile arthritis (JA) is an umbrella term used to describe the many autoimmune and inflammatory conditions that can develop in children ages 16 and younger. During the month of July, learn what you can and help those affected.

Most forms of juvenile arthritis are autoimmune disorders, which means that the body’s immune system—which normally helps to fight off bacteria or viruses—mistakenly attacks some of its own healthy cells and tissues. The result is inflammation, marked by redness, heat, pain and swelling. This inflammation can cause joint damage. Doctors do not know why the immune system attacks healthy tissues in children who develop JA. Scientists suspect that it is a two-step process. First, something in a child’s genetic makeup gives him or her a tendency to develop JA; then an environmental factor, such as a virus, triggers the development of the disease.

The most common symptom of all types of juvenile arthritis is persistent joint swelling, pain and stiffness that is typically worse in the morning or after a nap. The pain may limit movement of the affected joint, although many children, especially younger ones, will not complain of pain. JA commonly affects the knees and the joints in the hands and feet. One of the earliest signs of JA may be limping in the morning because of an affected knee.

The most important step in properly treating your child’s JA is getting an accurate diagnosis. The diagnostic process can be long and detailed. The child’s pediatrician will likely recommend that you visit a pediatric rheumatologist who will then take a complete health history and exam to determine the length of time and type of symptoms present. Along with the physical exam itself, your child’s doctors may take a number of other diagnostic steps – such as laboratory work and x-rays and other imaging tests - in part to rule out other potential causes of symptoms.

Unfortunately, there is no cure for juvenile arthritis. The goal of treatment for JA is to relieve inflammation, control pain and improve your child’s quality of life. Most treatment plans involve a combination of medication, various therapies and healthy living. A general exercise program is an important part of a child’s treatment plan; an important member of your child’s health care team is their physical therapist. A PT can work with your child to develop a plan of exercises that will improve joint function and strengthen muscles, without causing further harm to affected joints. Having arthritis should be part of your child’s life – not the central focus of his life.

Wakefield, MA – (June 15, 2015) June is National Migraine & Headache Awareness Month. Over 37 million people in the U.S. are diagnosed with migraines. Although 47% of the adult population experience headaches annually, these disorders are poorly recognized and inadequately treated. To try and help, this year’s theme is, “help make migraines visible!” Educating others, and ourselves, as well as building awareness about migraines are the best methods we have of making migraines visible.

There are a number of reasons to help make migraines visible. Two of the most significant of those reasons are:

  • Ridding ourselves of the myths and misconceptions about migraines and the resulting stigma. Studies have shown that the stigma associated with migraines increases the burden of living with the disease.
  • Making migraines more visible could result in more research funding which, in turn, would result in more and better treatments.

For those experiencing chronic migrainetreatment involves both lifestyle changes and medical approaches. They can include medications, antidepressants and complimentary and alternative diets and therapies.

So where does physical therapy fit into the management of migraine headaches? The answer depends on the individual headache sufferer, as there is a wide range of clinical presentations in patients with migraine headaches. Physical therapy primarily involves work on the muscles and joints in the peripheral system. This means how an individual migraine sufferer responds to physical therapy depends partly on the extent to which the muscles and joints are involved in their headaches. The goals of physical therapy treatment are generally to normalize the musculoskeletal system as much as possible in order to reduce stress and tension on the soft tissues and joints. At HD Physical Therapy, we work individually with our migraine patients on the best ways to utilize modalities such as ice and relaxation, stretches and exercise, and manual and massage techniques. 

Wakefield, MA – (May 11, 2015) HD Physical Therapy announced that Thursday, May 14 marks the company's 3rd anniversary and that they are also welcoming a new team member!

In May of 2012, HDPT co-founders Ed Harding, PTA and Glenn D’Addario, MSPT, DPT, set out to create an exceptional place where they could help as many people as possible. After three years, they are very proud and excited to be accomplishing just that. Through diligence and dedication, their clinic has grown from the 3 staff members it opened with to over 12 employees. They have been able to treat almost 1900 patients. They have mentored approximately 25 high school and physical therapy students. They have made various appearances at area health fairs, high schools and community events, as well as contributed to numerous charities. In 2013, they received national recognition for their overall success by winning ADVANCE Magazine’s “Best PT Practice 2013” silver medal. In response to their growth, they recently had to expand their office space and are now able to treat more patients, more efficiently, plus provide a more pleasant and advantageous environment for their staff.

“We want to extend a heartfelt thank you to our referrers and advocates for helping make HDPT’s third year a continued success,” said CEO & co-founder Ed Harding. “Thank you for supporting our practice, for referring patients, for trusting and believing in us, and for giving HDPT such a positive community presence. As our practice continues to grow and expand, we know that we would not be where we are today without the continued encouragement of our friends and family, and for that we are infinitely grateful,” said Harding.

Also this May, HD Physical Therapy is excited to announce a new team member; Sean M. Flaherty, PT, OCS will join HDPT. “We welcome Sean to the HDPT family. The experience and clinical knowledge he brings is second to none. I am confident that he will immediately increase our ability to provide better care to even more people,” says Glenn R. D’Addario, MSPT, DPT, President & co-founder of HD Physical Therapy. “I am looking forward to working with Sean again, and to see how much further we can grow HDPT all together.”

Mr. Sean Flaherty is widely known for his advanced clinical knowledge of orthopedics and sports medicine. His esteemed reputation is based on his extensive education and almost 20 years of experience. Combining his meticulous diagnostic abilities, his steadfast treatment approaches and his reliable results with his medicinal wisdom and proficiency, Sean’s patients appreciate his ability to offer the most comprehensive and effective care available. Mr. Flaherty received his Bachelor of Science degree in physical therapy from Northeastern University and is a Board-Certified Orthopedic Clinical Specialist. 

Wakefield, MA – (April 21, 2015) This April, millions of people around the world will recognize April as Parkinson’s Disease Awareness Month.

Statistics show:

  • Nearly one million Americans are living with Parkinson’s disease.
  • Approximately 60,000 Americans are diagnosed with Parkinson’s disease each year, and this number does not reflect the thousands of cases that go undetected.
  • Seven to 10 million people worldwide are estimated to be living with Parkinson’s disease.
  • Incidence of Parkinson’s increases with age, but an estimated four percent of people with Parkinson’s are diagnosed before the age of 50.

Parkinson's disease is a progressive, neurodegenerative disease. The condition is associated with the inability to produce the chemical dopamine in the brain. Dopamine is a chemical messenger within the brain that transmits information between brain cells to signal the body to produce movement. The reduction of dopamine causes symptoms such as tremors, tightening of the muscles, slowing down of and difficulty initiating movement. These indicators can cause a great deal of disability; yet can be successfully managed with physical therapy.

A trained physical therapist will work closely with the patient, and family members, to monitor the condition and improve functional capacity as much as possible. The therapist will conduct an evaluation of gait, balance, coordination, strength and posture. Therapy can help compensate for the changes brought about by the condition. These treatments include learning about new movement techniques, strategies and equipment. A physical therapist can teach exercises to strengthen, stretch and loosen muscles, while maintaining stability and mobility. This can improve your independence and quality of life. Plus, the caregiver can be provided with tools and information to keep the patient mobile with movement patterns and home exercise programs.

Wakefield, MA – (March 16, 2015) March is National Multiple Sclerosis Education and Awareness Month! It is an effort by the Multiple Sclerosis Foundation (MSF) to raise the public's awareness of multiple sclerosis (MS). The vital goals of the campaign are to promote an understanding of the scope of the disease, and to assist those with MS in making educated decisions about their healthcare.

A diagnosis of MS does not necessarily mean that you will experience severe disability. MS is a disease of mobility, and physical therapy is indicated for the treatment of mobility deficits. A referral to physical therapy should come as early as possible in the course of the disease, before deficits can become profoundly disabling. With proper medical and physical therapy management, MS is viewed as a disease that can be managed over a lifetime.

The mobility deficits that are most often seen in MS patients are multifactorial. Loss of strength, range of motion, endurance, gait and balance occur as a result of a complex assortment of interacting factors. Physical therapists are uniquely trained to evaluate, assess and treat these mobility deficits.

Physical therapists can help many MS patients with their primary and their secondary symptoms. A primary symptom may be experiencing a lack of coordination, having involuntary movements or resisting movement (spasticity). Primary symptoms can gradually make you inactive, therefore leading to secondary symptoms, such as feeling tired, and experiencing tightness, pain and weakness, especially in the muscles and joints.

“Physical therapy cannot cure primary MS symptoms; at this time, neurological damage cannot be reversed. However, PT can be very helpful in teaching compensatory behaviors. These techniques could enable you to counteract the physical changes brought on by MS. They could include learning new movement practices, strategies and equipment,” says HDPT co-founder and president, Dr. Glenn D’Addario, MSPT. “The right therapy can also be very helpful with decreasing the secondary symptoms of MS. A trained physical therapist can teach you exercises you can use to strengthen and stretch muscles, while maintaining stability and mobility. This can improve your independence and quality of life, plus help relieve pain.”

Wakefield, MA – (January 19, 2015) Wakefield/Rotary District 7930 is holding its 5th Annual Polar Plunge on Saturday, January 31, at 11:15am, on Long Beach in Gloucester, right in front of the Cape Ann Motor Inn.

This year's plungers include Wakefield Rotary Club Board member and HDPT co-founder Ed Harding, PTA, along with HDPT co-founder Glenn D'Addario, MSPT, DPT, and staff members, Svet Wilson, PTA, ATC, Robbie Barletta, PTA, Becca Marrama and rookie jumpers Ryan Moore and Shereen Rahimi. We also have DPT co-op student Michelle Poirier, HDPT family members Elliot Shea and Katie Crowley, as well as Wakefield’s Rebirth Transformation Center's Founder Julian Cardoos!

Team captain Ed explains, “for as little as 60 cents worth of an oral vaccine, a child can be protected from the disease for life. The plunge event is fun for everyone, but the real money we raise directly translates to thousands of vaccines. It is an amazing feeling to know that we have a hand in preventing a crippling disease from affecting children.”

A hallmark of The Rotary Foundation, the End Polio Now campaign to erradicate polio world-wide, is 99% complete with its mission. Only the second disease to be erradicated from the planet, polio continues to threaten Pakistan, Afghanistan and Nigeria. The Rotary Foundation has led the efforts to eradicate polio since 1985 and has developed strategic partnerships including The World Health Organization, UNICEF, Center for Disease Control, international advocates, and local governments. The Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation continues to be the largest financial supporter for the eradication effort and has provided grants totalling $555 million to The Rotary Foundation for vaccination and awareness campaigns.

Support TEAM HDPT and the Wakefield/District 7930 Rotary Club’s plan to eradicate polio in our lifetime. Pledge today and come watch them all take the plunge!

Find the event on our Facebook page or visit HD Physical Therapy’s donation page: https://rotary.fundraise.com/eds-2015-polar-plunge-page

Wakefield, MA – (Movember 3, 2014) – It’s Movember, the time of year when the mustache takes over the world for one month. Movember is the global men's health charity encouraging men to grow, and women to support, the Mo (moustache) for the 30 days of November. Through the power of the moustache, Movember participants and partners raise funds and awareness for men’s health. The moustache is our hairy ribbon, and our symbol for change.

HDPT’s co-founding partners, Ed Harding, PTA and Glenn D’Addario, MSPT, DPT, along with staff members Svet Wilson, PTA, ATC, Robbie Barletta, PTA, and Ryan Moore are joining the cause this month. The men began the month clean-shaven, and will be documenting their growth journey on Facebook, Twitter, Google+, Instagram and on our own HDPT blog.

Why is Movember so important? One of the biggest obstacles men tackle in regards to their health is a reluctance to discuss issues they face either with their partner, family or doctor. Movember was born from recognition that a fun and engaging initiative could help encourage men to become more actively involved in their own health. Movember aims to increase awareness and support for men's health by getting conversations started, at a grassroots level, educating men about the health risks they face, and raising vital funds for support programs.

Need more facts? According to Movember.com:

  • The average life expectancy for men in the United States is almost five years less than women (76.2 years compared to 81 years).
  • Around 15 million American adults (6.7% of the population) are diagnosed with depression each year.
  • 1 in 2 men will be diagnosed with cancer in their lifetime.
  • More than one-third of adults (34.9%) in the United States are obese.
  • 12.1% of men 18 years and over are in fair or poor health.
  • Prostate cancer is the 2nd most common cancer in men in the United States.
  • In 2014, more than 233,000 men will be diagnosed with prostate cancer.
  • 1 in 7 men will be diagnosed with prostate cancer in their lifetime.
  • 1 in 36 men will die from prostate cancer (about 29,480 men) accounting for about 22% of all male deaths from cancer.
  • Risk of being diagnosed with prostate cancer increases with age.
  • Testicular cancer is the most common cancer in young men aged 15 - 35 years.
  • About 8,820 new cases of testicular cancer are diagnosed in men each year.
  • About 380 men will die of testicular cancer.
  • The five-year relative survival rate for men in the United States with localized testicular cancer is 99%.
  • 1 in 4 adults in the United States will experience a mental health problem in a given year.
  • Around 15 million American adults (6.7% of the population) are diagnosed with depression each year.
  • 1 in 5 adults each year experience an anxiety disorder.
  • In 2010, a total of 38,364 Americans died by suicide and over three-quarters (79%) of these suicides were men.
  • More than four times as many men as women die by suicide in the United States.

According to Movember.com, the event has created over 3 billion conversations about men’s health, and since it began in 2003, there have been 4,027,688 Mo Bros and Mo Sistas registered, and $559 million USD have been raised. This year, HDPT has again formed an official team fundraising page to collect donations and support the cause.

To participate, follow our photos on Facebook, Twitter, Google+, Instagram and on our blog, join the HDPT Movember team online, spread the word, donate to the cause, and grow a MOUSTACHE. Find team HDPT at: http://mobro.co/HDPTonline.

Wakefield, MA – (October 15, 2014) – National Physical Therapy Month is celebrated each October to recognize how physical therapists and physical therapist assistants help transform society by restoring and improving motion in people's lives. This October, HD Physical Therapy is recognizing National PT Month by joining the American Physical Therapy Association’s public education campaign designed to debunk 7 of the most common myths about physical therapy.

People everywhere are experiencing the transformative effect physical therapy can have on their daily lives. In fact, as experts in the way the body moves, physical therapists help people of all ages and abilities reduce pain, improve or restore mobility, and stay active and fit throughout life. But there are some common misconceptions that often discourage people from visiting a physical therapist.

It's time to debunk 7 common myths about physical therapy:

1. Myth: I need a referral to see a physical therapist.

Fact: A recent survey by the American Physical Therapy Association (APTA) revealed 70% of people think a referral or prescription is required for evaluation by a physical therapist. However, all 50 states and the District of Columbia (DC) allow patients to be evaluated by a physical therapist without a physician's prior referral. In addition, 48 states and DC allow for some form of treatment or intervention without a physician referral or prescription. This is called Direct Access.

2. Myth: Physical therapy is painful.

Fact: Physical therapists seek to minimize your pain and discomfort—including chronic or long-term pain. They work within your pain threshold to help you heal, and restore movement and function. The survey found that although 71% of people who have never visited a physical therapist think physical therapy is painful, that number significantly decreases among patients who have seen a physical therapist in the past year.

3. Myth: Physical therapy is only for injuries and accidents.

Fact: Physical therapists do a lot more than just stretch or strengthen weak muscles after an injury or surgery. They are skilled at evaluating and diagnosing potential problems before they lead to more serious injuries or disabling conditions—from carpal tunnel syndrome and frozen shoulder, to chronic headaches and lower back pain, to name a few.

4. Myth: Any health care professional can perform physical therapy.

Fact: Although 42% of consumers know that physical therapy can only be performed by a licensed physical therapist, 37% still believe other health care professionals can also administer physical therapy. Many physical therapists also pursue board certification in specific areas such as neurology, orthopedics, sports, or women’s health, for example.

5. Myth: Physical therapy isn't covered by insurance.

Fact: Most insurance policies cover some form of physical therapy. Beyond insurance coverage, physical therapy has proven to reduce costs by helping people avoid unnecessary imaging scans, surgery, or prescription drugs. Physical therapy can also lower costs by helping patients avoid falls or by addressing conditions before they become chronic.

6. Myth: Surgery is my only option.

Fact: In many cases, physical therapy has been shown to be as effective as surgery in treating a wide range of conditions—from rotator cuff tears and degenerative disk disease, to meniscal tears and some forms of knee osteoarthritis. Those who have recently seen a physical therapist know this to be true, with 79% believing physical therapy can provide an alternative to surgery.

7. Myth: I can do physical therapy myself.

Fact: Your participation is key to a successful treatment plan, but every patient still needs the expert care and guidance of a licensed physical therapist. Your therapist will leverage his or her specialized education, clinical expertise, and the latest available evidence to evaluate your needs and make a diagnosis before creating an individualized plan of care.

Join HD Physical Therapy in challenging the myths with the facts about physical therapy.

Wakefield, MA – (September 30, 2014) – HD Physical Therapy announces it has enhanced its services by adding a new staff member; Shereen Rahimi has joined the practice as a Billing Specialist.

“We welcome Shereen to the HDPT family. I am confident that she will increase our ability to provide better service to even more people,” says Edward Harding, PTA, CEO & co-founder of HD Physical Therapy. “I am looking forward to working with Shereen, and continuing to provide our patients with a smooth and hassle-free rehabilitation experience.”

Shereen graduated from Peabody Veteran’s Memorial High School. After graduation, she attended the University of Massachusetts - Amherst, majoring in Psychology. There she was a member of the service-based leadership development organization, Alpha Phi Omega.

Shereen then moved to New Hampshire and began working at the Manchester Community College bookstore while attending school. Shereen graduated from Seacoast Career Schools with a Certificate as a Health Claims Specialist. She also completed an internship with the Milford Ambulance Service billing department, and she took the AAPC's Certified Professional Coder (CPC®) exam and became a Certified Professional Coder.

Shereen then moved back to Massachusetts and began working at the Middlesex Community College bookstore in Bedford, while attending school there. Shereen graduated with an Associate in Science degree, majoring in Business Administration. She was also a member of Phi Beta Kappa Society, the national honor society for liberal arts and sciences.

Miss Rahimi joined the HDPT team in June of 2014. She is responsible for health insurance processing, billing, collections and coding.

Shereen enjoys running and hopes to pursue her Bachelor of Science degree in Accounting. She currently resides in Peabody, MA.  

Wakefield, MA – (September 15, 2014) – HD Physical Therapy celebrates National Rehabilitation Awareness Week, September 21-27.

Since 1976, the mission of National Rehabilitation Awareness Week is to be a nationwide celebration that helps educate people about the benefits and impact of rehabilitation, develops programs that increases opportunities for the over fifty million Americans with disabilities, and helps those who are disabled live up to their fullest potential.

Disability is the consequence of an impairment that may be physical, cognitive, mental, sensory, emotional, developmental, or some combination of these. Some estimates suggest that 10% of the world's population has some form of disability. That number will grow significantly over the next 20 years as the baby-boomer generation enters later life, when the risk of disability is greatest. The field of physical therapy is central to ensuring an optimal future for people with disability across the globe.

Most people share the desire to be as well, mobile, independent and pain free as possible. Physical therapists are highly trained and licensed health care professionals who diagnose and manage individuals of all ages, who have medical problems or other health-related conditions that limit their abilities to move and perform functional activities in their daily lives. Physical therapists examine each individual, develop a plan of care, and use treatment techniques to promote the ability to move, reduce pain, restore function and prevent, or work to improve, disability. Physical therapists also work with individuals to prevent injury and the loss of mobility by developing fitness- and wellness-oriented programs for healthier and more active lifestyles.

If you are still unsure about what physical therapy can do for you, your friends, or your family, visit HD Physical Therapy; we can happily answer any questions that you may have. 

Wakefield, MA – (June 5, 2014) June 1 is the start of Migraine & Headache Awareness Month. Over 37 million people in the U.S. are diagnosed with migraine. Although 47% of the adult population experience headaches annually, these disorders are poorly recognized and inadequately treated. Purple is the recognized color for Migraine and Headache Awareness. That is why the National Headache Foundation is standing up to “show purple” during June. We challenge everyone else to stand up with us and let others know they are not alone.

For those experiencing chronic migrainetreatment involves both lifestyle changes and medical approaches. They can include migraine medications, antidepressants and complimentary and alternative therapies. Also, the Seven Healthy Habits of Headache Sufferers include the following tips that can be easily incorporated into sufferers’ lives:

  1. Diet: Eat regular meals, avoiding foods and drinks that are known to trigger your attacks.
  2. Sleep: Maintain a regular sleeping schedule, including weekends, holidays and vacations.
  3. Stress: Implement stress reduction techniques into your daily life.
  4. Headache and Migraine diary: Keep a headache and Migraine diary of when your attacks occur, along with any triggers, the medications used, and other information, and share the information with your healthcare provider.
  5. See your healthcare provider: Make an appointment with your healthcare provider to specifically discuss your headaches and your treatment options.
  6. Be a partner in your health care: Be informed, be a participant in your treatment and be an advocate for your care.
  7. Education: Stay apprised of the latest headache and migraine news and treatment. 

So where does physical therapy fit into the management of migraine headaches? The answer depends on the individual headache sufferer, as there is a wide range of clinical presentations in patients with migraine headache. Physical therapy primarily involves work on the muscles and joints in the peripheral system. This means how an individual migraine sufferer responds to physical therapy depends partly on the extent to which the muscles and joints are involved in their headaches. The goals of physical therapy treatment are generally to normalize the musculoskeletal system as much as possible in order to reduce stress and tension on the soft tissues and joints. At HD Physical Therapy, we work with our migraine patients on the best ways to utilize modalities such as ice and relaxation, stretches and exercise and massage techniques. 

Wakefield, MA – (May 28, 2014) HD Physical Therapy is supporting the President’s Council on Fitness, Sports & Nutrition in honor of National Physical Fitness and Sports Month. During the month of May, we challenge all adults to get 30 minutes of physical activity every day.

Did you know that regular physical activity increases your chances of living a longer, healthier life? It also reduces your risk for high blood pressure, heart disease, and some types of cancer. Yet in Massachusetts, 20.9% of adults report that during the past month, they had not participated in any physical activity.

The Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans recommend that adults:

  • Aim for 2 hours and 30 minutes of moderate aerobic activity each week. Moderate activity includes things like walking fast, dancing, swimming, and raking leaves.
  • Do muscle-strengthening activities – like lifting weights and using exercises bands – at least 2 days a week. 

There are just too many benefits to an active lifestyle to ignore. Our obesity epidemic and the host of chronic diseases that can be combated by making activity a part of our lives are two big ones. Generally speaking, the main health benefits of exercise include: stress reduction/relaxation, improvement in energy levels and moods, maintenance of strong bones and joints, and prevention of high blood pressure, diabetes and heart disease.

Therefore, physical activity is for everyone. Throughout the month and beyond, HD Physical Therapy is encouraging children and their families to get up, get out and be active. Whether it’s running around on the blacktop before school, or walking around the neighborhood with your family after dinner, set aside time for some fun physical activity each day. Sign up for a fun run, try that new yoga class you’ve been eyeing, take your bike out on one of our local trails, or go for a leisurely stroll with friends or colleagues at lunchtime. May is usually a beautiful time of year in our area…get outside and take advantage of the weather!

Wakefield, MA – (May 12, 2014) HD Physical Therapy announced today that Wednesday, May 14 marks the company's 2nd anniversary!

In 2012, HDPT co-founders Ed Harding, PTA and Glenn D’Addario, MSPT, DPT, set out to create an exceptional place where they could help as many people as possible.

In two years, they are very proud and excited to be accomplishing that. Through diligence and dedication, their clinic has grown from the 3 people it opened with to over 11 employees. They have been able to treat over 800 patients. They have mentored approximately 20 high school and physical therapy students. They have made various appearances at area health fairs, high schools and community events, as well as contributed to numerous charities. And, most significantly, just this last year the company received national recognition for its overall success by winning ADVANCE Magazine’s “Best PT Practice 2013” silver medal.

“We want to extend a heartfelt thank you to our referrers and advocates for helping make HDPT’s second year a continued success,” said co-founder Ed Harding. “Thank you everyone for supporting our practice, for referring patients, for trusting and believing in us, and for helping to put HDPT on the map. As our practice continues to grow, we know that we would not be where we are today without the continued encouragement of our friends and family, and for that we are infinitely grateful,” said Harding. 

Wakefield, MA – (April 16, 2014) This April, millions of people around the world will recognize April as Parkinson’s Awareness Month.

 Statistics show:

  • Nearly one million Americans are living with Parkinson’s.
  • Approximately 60,000 Americans are diagnosed with Parkinson’s disease each year, and this number does not reflect the thousands of cases that go undetected.
  • Seven to 10 million people worldwide are estimated to be living with Parkinson’s disease.
  • Incidence of Parkinson’s increases with age, but an estimated four percent of people with Parkinson’s are diagnosed before the age of 50.

Parkinson's disease is a progressive neurodegenerative disease. The condition is associated with the inability to produce the chemical dopamine in the brain. Dopamine is a chemical messenger within the brain that transmits information between brain cells to signal the body to produce movement. The reduction of dopamine causes symptoms such as tremors, tightening of the muscles, slowing down of and difficulty initiating movement. These indicators can cause a great deal of disability, yet can be effectively managed with physical therapy.

Physical therapy cannot cure Parkinson's disease; at this time, neurological damage cannot be reversed. But therapy can help you compensate for the changes brought about by the condition. These treatments include learning about new movement techniques, strategies and equipment. A physical therapist can teach you exercises to strengthen and loosen muscles. The goal of physical therapy is to improve your independence and quality of life by improving movement, function and relieving pain.

A physical therapist will work closely with the patient and family members to monitor the condition and improve functional capacity as much as possible. The therapist will conduct an evaluation of gait, balance, coordination, strength and posture. The caregiver is provided the tools and information to keep the patient mobile with movement patterns and home exercise programs.

“After college, I began working at Massachusetts General Hospital in the memory disorders unit. Assisting people with neurological and cognitive impairments facilitated my strong interest in the field; I enjoy working with patient's with Parkinson’s and other neurological conditions,” says HDPT physical therapist Christine Cunha, DPT. “My goal is to enable my patients to live well by providing effective interventions to promote health and well-being, and by educating them on long-term self-management strategies. Seeing how much I can help people with Parkinson’s disease, as well as educating their families with different techniques that improve their lives, is a very rewarding experience,” says Dr. Cunha. 

Wakefield, MA – (March 5, 2014) “We’ve Got Your Back” is the theme of this year’s National Athletic Training Month, which is sponsored by the National Athletic Trainers’ Association (NATA), a not-for-profit organization based in Dallas, Texas.

Athletic Trainers (ATs) are licensed and certified health care professionals who collaborate with physicians and physical therapists (PTs). The services provided by ATs comprise prevention, emergency care, clinical assessment, therapeutic intervention and rehabilitation of injuries and sports-related illness.

The PT and the AT can be critical partners on the rehabilitation team of the injured athlete; many parts of an athlete’s rehabilitation can be done synergistically by both the clinical PT and the AT. Many PTs will take advantage of their relationship with an AT to help co-create a treatment plan that addresses each individual athlete’s specific needs.

At HD Physical Therapy, one of our therapists, Svet Wilson, PTA, ATC/L, is a licensed physical therapist assistant, as well as a licensed and certified athletic trainer. Combining his years of education and experience in both disciplines has allowed Svet to become an expert sports medicine clinician; he is highly skilled in preventing, recognizing, managing and rehabilitating injuries that result from athletics and other physical activity.

“For me, each field supports the other, and combining them creates the best possible scenario for the patient or athlete that I am working with,” said Wilson. “By merging the best of both, people are given the highest quality of care, and achieve the best outcomes possible.”

Wakefield, MA – (February 19, 2014) HD Physical Therapy is excited to help more patients with a new treatment system - The Quick Board.

The Quick Board is a state-of-the-art diagnostic and training system used by professional, college and amateur athletes to aid in athletic training, testing and rehabilitation – both physical and neurological. It provides physical therapists a way to quickly capture valid, accurate data to help them track training progress, test for overtraining and make objective decisions. Its high impact sensors track each time someone makes contact with a specific part of the board, and real-time results are transferred to a visible control panel, like an iPad, for easy and objective evaluation.

“The Quick Board is a very unique, interactive tool. I can use it for anything - ankles, knees, shoulders core strengthening, lumbar stability, etc. It challenges patients in a way they never have been challenged before, testing their agility, reaction time, balance and quickness,” said HDPT therapist Svet Wilson, PTA, ATC. “We can even out deficiencies; unlike with a typical ladder drill, I can actually see the discrepancy between two sides and immediately adjust our program. Plus, using the iPad, patients can also visualize their own progression and can compare their scores. They can check themselves, and I can continuously check myself as a therapist,” said Wilson.

The Quick Board can:

  • Enhance and shorten the rehabilitation process and assist with critical sports medicine evaluations and decisions such as "return to play" with objective, real-time data.
  • Deliver baseline scores on speed, agility and reaction drills to compare pre- and post-injury data, track daily progress, and evaluate the effectiveness of your rehabilitation program.
  • Restore pre-injury communication between the brain and the injured body part - neurological rehabilitation. This is a critical advancement in therapy, as sports medicine professionals have found that even after athletes have returned to pre-injury strength and range of motion, they may suffer from a neurological deficit, which increases the risk of another injury.
  • Enable our therapists to better determine whether a patient is favoring a non-injured body part during recovery. The Quick Board’s sensors track when an athlete doesn’t fully use an injured side of the body. This type of overcompensation can cause athletes to favor their healthy, non-injured legs, which can lead to additional injuries.

 

Wakefield, MA – (January 22, 2014) Wakefield/Rotary District 7930 is holding its 4th Annual Polar Plunge on Saturday, February 1, at 11:00am, on Long Beach in Gloucester, right in front of the Cape Ann Motor Inn.

This year's HD Physical Therapy Team plungers include Wakefield Rotary Club member Ed Harding, along with rookie jumpers, HDPT co-founder Glenn D'Addario, MSPT, DPT, and staff members, Svet Wilson, PTA, ATC, Robbie Barletta, PTA, Marilena Lobrutto, Katie Crowley & Becca Marrama!

TEAM HDPT’s fundraising goal is $3000, with the Wakefield Rotary’s cash donation goal being $10,000, to aid in the district’s goal of raising $100,000.

Team captain, plunger Ed explains, “for as little as 60 cents worth of an oral vaccine, a child can be protected from the disease for life. The plunge event is fun for everyone, but the real money we raise directly translates to thousands of vaccines. It is an amazing feeling to know that we have a hand in preventing a crippling disease from affecting children.”

In 2012, 429 million children were vaccinated against polio, with less then 300 cases reported. That figure represents a decline of more then 60% from 2011.

Since 1985, Polio has become the signature cause for Rotary International, with the mission to eradicate it from the world entirely. More than a billion dollars has been raised between Rotary clubs world wide, and the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. When Rotary took on the battle against this disease more then 350,000 people spanning 125 countries were impacted. Today there are three countries left where it has not been eradicated, Pakistan, Afghanistan and Nigeria.

Support TEAM HDPT and the Wakefield/District 7930 Rotary Club’s plan to eradicate polio in our lifetime. Pledge today and come watch them all take the plunge!

Visit HD Physical Therapy’s donation page:
https://www.fundraise.com/the-rotary-foundation-of-rotary-international/ed-hardings-fundraising-page2?utm_source=facebook&utm_medium=f&utm_campaign=lpLs

Wakefield, MA – (January 8, 2014) HD Physical Therapy is honored to announce that they received the silver medal in ADVANCE Magazine for Physical Therapy & Rehab Medicine’s 12th annual Practice of the Year contest! The award was recently broadcasted in the December 2013 issue.

“For being a single-location clinic only in practice for 18 months, winning second place in this prestigious, national competition is an immense honor,” said HDPT co-founder Glenn D’Addario, MSPT, DPT.

“My partner, Ed Harding, PTA, and I have similar values and share the same vision. We wanted to create an exceptional place where we could help as many people as possible,” D’Addario said. “We are very proud and excited to have accomplished that, and to be recognized for it in such a significant manner. This award is a true reflection of the diligence and dedication we have put into HDPT, and of our extraordinary team that we share this with.”

Now in its 12th year, the ADVANCE Practice of the Year Contest tallies anonymous entries from across the globe, and scores them on a range of success metrics. They look at customer service standards, practice growth, revenue growth, recruiting and staff development and professional standing. The contest is free to enter and is never connected with advertising contracts or other incentives. The judging panel is made up exclusively of physical therapy private practice owners and previous winners of the contest.

The physical therapy practices that were chosen as runners up in this year's installment of the contest are all focusing on expanding their offering of services, staying true to the guiding principles of the profession, using new media to promote themselves and the physical therapy profession, and above all, offering superior consumer service through evidence-based care.

Read the full article online:
http://physical-therapy.advanceweb.com/Features/Articles/On-the-Podium-2.aspx

Wakefield, MA – (December 9, 2013) - November was Movember, the time of year when the mustache took over the world for one month. Through the power of the moustache, Movember participants and partners raised funds and awareness for men’s health.

HDPT’s co-founding partners, Ed Harding, PTA and Glenn D’Addario, MSPT, DPT, along with staff members Svet Wilson, PTA, ATC and Robbie Barletta, PTA formed an official team. The men began the month clean-shaven, and documented their growth journey on Facebook, Instagram and on their HDPT blog.

This year, HD Physical Therapy was able to collect $450 from friends, family and patients, a 200% increase from last year!

Why was Movember so important? One of the biggest obstacles men tackle in regards to general well-being is a reluctance to discuss health issues they face either with their partner, family or doctor. Movember was born from recognition that a fun and engaging initiative could help encourage men to become more actively involved in their own health. Movember aims to increase awareness and support for men's health by getting conversations started at a grassroots level, educating men about the health risks they face and raising vital funds for support programs.

“We were happy to continue the tradition at HDPT. Growing mustaches really helped get people involved, talking about men’s health and donating to the cause,” said HDPT’s co-founder & CEO Ed Harding, PTA. “We look forward to continuing to make a bigger and bigger impact each year, during Movember!”

Wakefield, MA – (Movember 4, 2013) – It’s Movember, the time of year when the mustache takes over the world for one month. Movember is the global men's health charity encouraging men to grow, and women to support, the Mo (moustache) for the 30 days of November. Through the power of the moustache, Movember participants and partners raise funds and awareness for men’s health.

HDPT’s co-founding partners, Ed Harding, PTA and Glenn D’Addario, MSPT, DPT, along with staff members Svet Wilson, PTA, ATC and Robbie Barletta, PTA, are joining the cause this month. The men began the month clean-shaven, and will be documenting their growth journey on Facebook, Instagram and on our HDPT blog.

Why is Movember so important? One of the biggest obstacles men tackle in regards to general well-being, is a reluctance to discuss health issues they face either with their partner, family or doctor. Movember was born from recognition that a fun and engaging initiative could help encourage men to become more actively involved in their own health. Movember aims to increase awareness and support for men's health by getting conversations started at a grassroots level, educating men about the health risks they face and raising vital funds for support programs.

Need more facts?

  • In 2013, more than 238,000 men will be diagnosed with prostate cancer and more than 30,000 men will die from prostate cancer.
  • A man is 35% more likely to be diagnosed with prostate cancer than a woman is to be diagnosed with breast cancer.
  • One new prostate cancer case occurs every 2.2 minutes and a man dies from prostate cancer every 17.5 minutes.
  • Prostate cancer is the most frequently diagnosed cancer in men after skin cancer.
  • Prostate cancer is the second-leading cause of cancer death in men.
  • 97% of prostate cancer cases occur in men age 50 and older.
  • 1 in 2 men will be diagnosed with cancer in their lifetime, 1 in 3 women will be.
  • 1 in 6 men will be diagnosed with prostate cancer in their lifetime.
  • Testicular cancer is the most common cancer in American males between the ages of 15 and 34.
  • 7,920 new cases of testicular cancer are expected to be diagnosed in 2013.
  • Because treatment is so successful, the risk of dying from testicular cancer is very low: about 1 in 5,000.
  • 370 men will die from testicular cancer in 2013.
  • Men generally have lower levels of awareness of mental illnesses than women.
  • Over 6 million men (7% of the population) are diagnosed with depression each year.
  • One of the most common manifestations of mental illness is depression.

According to Movember.com, the event has created 2.7 billion conversations about men’s health, and in 2012, 1.1 million participants were registered worldwide, raising $147M USD for men's health initiatives. This year, HDPT has again formed an official team fundraising page to collect donations. Join their team or donate directly at: http://us.movember.com/team/1003453.

Wakefield, MA – (October 21, 2013)– HD Physical Therapy celebrates National Physical Therapy Month this October by highlighting the recent report published by the American Physical Therapy Association and The Huffington Post.

The APTA and Huff/Post50 announced the "Top 10 Fittest Baby Boomer Cities in America." The cities were identified based on a survey that evaluated factors contributing to a fit and active lifestyle as people age. Cities were rated on life expectancy, cardiovascular health, and reported stress levels of baby boomers, as well as access to local health care and fitness resources.

Boston, less than 15 miles from Wakefield, was named #5!

  • Of the 50 cities reviewed, Boston has the highest percentage of Boomers with health insurance, at nearly 95%.
  • The percentage of Bostonians who reported being “satisfied” or “very satisfied” with their lives is 94.
  • Diagnosed cases of hypertension (approximately 49%) are 4% lower than the average for all 50 cities researched.
  • There are 103 gyms and fitness centers in the city.
  • Life expectancy is 80.5 years, approximately 2 years higher than the average for all 50 cities reviewed.
  • Of the 50 cities reviewed, Boston has one of the lowest hospital mortality rates, more than 10% below the national average.
  • Boston’s population admits to not getting enough rest on more than 7 days in the last month.

"Baby boomers have redefined aging by their strong desire to maintain mobility and independence and live healthy, active lifestyles well into their 50s and beyond," said APTA spokesperson Alice Bell, PT, DPT, GCS. She explained, "Living in a fit city for baby boomers means you have many fitness and health care resources at your disposal—including access to physical therapists. Working with your physical therapist is an important part of maintaining and restoring motion, staying fit and active, and preventing injury as you age."

"A city's attributes can have quite an impact on the health of baby boomers," said Huff/Post50 editor Shelley Emling. "Mass transit availability, access to fitness, and quality health care facilities do influence your health and lifestyle. However, baby boomers are a cohort that is highly individualized. We're in control of our own destiny, and this study is a great reminder that we can live healthier lives when we access the resources around us."

Physical fitness is an integral part of overall health and well-being, and it becomes even more important with age. Baby boomer fitness is increasingly impacted by issues with joint health balance, and diminishing muscle mass. In addition, boomers need to consider workout modifications that help them stay active longer. Physical therapists address these issues and prescribe an exercise regimen that takes into account a boomer's individual health history and needs. 

To learn more about how physical therapists can help Boomers stay fit and active as they age, please visit www.HDPTonline.com, or call 781-587-0776.

Wakefield, MA – (September 10, 2013)– HD Physical Therapy celebrates National Rehabilitation Awareness Week, September 15-21.

The week is designed to promote the value of rehabilitation; highlight the capabilities of people with disabilities; to salute the professionals who provide service to people with disabilities; and to renew our nation's commitment to fulfill the unmet needs of people with disabilities.

Disability is the consequence of an impairment that may be physical, cognitive, mental, sensory, emotional, developmental, or some combination of these. Some estimates suggest that 10% of the world's population has some form of disability. According to 2005 US Census Bureau statistics, 54 million (18.7%) people in the United States have some level of disability. That number will grow significantly over the next 20 years as the baby-boom generation enters late life, when the risk of disability is greatest. The field of physical therapy is central to ensuring an optimal future for people with disability across the globe.

Most people share the desire to be as functional, independent and pain free as possible. Physical therapists are a highly effective alternative to prescription medication and surgery for many conditions. Physical therapists are highly trained and licensed health care professionals who diagnose and manage individuals of all ages, from newborns to elders, who have medical problems or other health-related conditions that limit their abilities to move and perform functional activities in their daily lives. Physical therapists examine each individual and develop a plan of care using treatment techniques to promote the ability to move, reduce pain, restore function and prevent, or work to improve, disability. Physical therapists also work with individuals to prevent injury and the loss of mobility by developing fitness- and wellness-oriented programs for healthier and more active lifestyles.

If you are still unsure about what physical therapy can do for you, stop in to see HD Physical Therapy anytime. We always offer free health screenings and clinic tours, and we are always available to answer any questions that you may have. 

Wakefield, MA – (August 20, 2013) – HD Physical Therapy celebrates August’s National Golf Month by offering tips on how to play it safe and protect yourself on the course. Many golfing-related injuries are results of poor mechanics or overuse, particularly in golfers who are new to the game or do not play often. Although golf is not a contact sport, it does put significant demands on your body, which can easily lead to golf injuries. Follow these tips from the Mayo Clinic and stay safe on the course.

Adjust your swing

Understanding the mechanics behind your golf swing can help you prevent golf injuries:

  • Use proper posture. Think about your posture before and during your swing. Stand with your feet shoulder-width apart and distribute your weight equally on both feet. Avoid hunching over the ball, which may contribute to neck and back strain.
  • Stay smooth. The power of a golf swing comes from force transferred smoothly through all the muscle groups, from your ankles to your wrists. If you depend on one part of your body for your hitting power, you may be more prone to injuries. For example, overemphasizing your wrists during your swing can lead to golfer's elbow — a strain of the muscles on the inside of the forearm.
  • Don't over swing. If you swing the club too hard or too fast, you may stress your joints. Relax and take a nice, easy swing at the ball. The best golfers have consistent — not necessarily fast — swing tempos.

Other tips to keep you on the course

There's more to golf than your golf swing. Consider other ways to lower your risk of golf injuries:

  • Warm up. Before you practice your golf swing or play a round of golf, warm up with a brisk walk or a set of jumping jacks. Stretch your hands, wrists, forearms, elbows, shoulders, spine and pelvis. Swing your golf club a few times, gradually increasing your range of motion.
  • Start slowly. You might practice your swing for hours, believing it's helping your game — but if your body isn't conditioned for the strain, practicing your golf swing may do more harm than good. Work up to your desired level of activity instead.
  • Strengthen your muscles. You don't need bulging muscles to hit a long drive — but the stronger your muscles, the greater your club speed. Better yet, stronger muscles are less prone to golf injuries. For best results, do strength-training exercises year-round.
  • Focus on flexibility. Regular stretching can improve your range of motion and lead to a more fluid golf swing.
  • Build up your endurance. Regular aerobic activity can give you staying power on the course. Try walking, jogging, bicycling or swimming.

Wakefield, MA – (July 15, 2013) July is Juvenile Arthritis Awareness Month. Juvenile Arthritis (JA) is one of the most common diseases in children, with almost 300,000 in the United States diagnosed. Arthritis is a complex family of musculoskeletal disorders consisting of more than 100 different diseases or conditions that destroy joints, bones, muscles, cartilage and other connective tissues. Juvenile arthritis (JA) is an umbrella term used to describe the many autoimmune and inflammatory conditions that can develop in children ages 16 and younger. During the month of July, learn what you can and help those affected.

Most forms of juvenile arthritis are autoimmune disorders, which means that the body’s immune system—which normally helps to fight off bacteria or viruses—mistakenly attacks some of its own healthy cells and tissues. The result is inflammation, marked by redness, heat, pain and swelling. This inflammation can cause joint damage. Doctors do not know why the immune system attacks healthy tissues in children who develop JA. Scientists suspect that it is a two-step process. First, something in a child’s genetic makeup gives him or her a tendency to develop JA; then an environmental factor, such as a virus, triggers the development of the disease.

The most common symptom of all types of juvenile arthritis is persistent joint swelling, pain and stiffness that is typically worse in the morning or after a nap. The pain may limit movement of the affected joint, although many children, especially younger ones, will not complain of pain. JA commonly affects the knees and the joints in the hands and feet. One of the earliest signs of JA may be limping in the morning because of an affected knee.

The most important step in properly treating your child’s JA is getting an accurate diagnosis. The diagnostic process can be long and detailed. The child’s pediatrician will likely recommend that you visit a pediatric rheumatologist who will then take a complete health history and exam to determine the length of time and type of symptoms present. Along with the physical exam itself, your child’s doctors may take a number of other diagnostic steps – such as laboratory work and x-rays and other imaging tests - in part to rule out other potential causes of symptoms.

Unfortunately, there is no cure for juvenile arthritis. The goal of treatment for JA is to relieve inflammation, control pain and improve your child’s quality of life. Most treatment plans involve a combination of medication, various therapies and healthy living.

Treating juvenile arthritis often requires a team approach, encompassing the child and his or her family and a number of different health professionals. A general exercise program is an important part of a child’s treatment plan; an important member of your child’s health care team is their physical therapist. A PT can work with your child to develop a plan of exercises that will improve joint function and strengthen muscles, without causing further harm to affected joints.

Coping with a chronic illness diagnosis is difficult for anyone, but especially for children who are not emotionally or physically equipped to handle the situation. Expect and prepare for your child to sometimes feel sad or angry that he or she has arthritis. Having arthritis will affect your entire family, but you can maintain a sense of calm and normalcy. Stick to as many of your child's daily routines and comforting habits as possible. Having arthritis should be part of your child’s life – not the central focus of his life.

For more information on Juvenile Arthritis, and what you can do to get involved, contact The Arthritis Foundation at www.arthritis.org. They lead the way in helping people with arthritis live better today and create better tomorrows through new treatments, better access and ultimately, cures.

At HDPT we are committed to the health and happiness of our patients. Everyday we work to restore each person's maximal function with consistency and compassion. Offering distinctive, inventive and proven rehabilitation treatment, our devoted professionals strive to deliver a successful and enjoyable experience to every patient we meet. HDPT proudly serves the communities of Wakefield, Reading, North Reading, Wilmington, Lynnfield, Saugus, Melrose, Peabody, Stoneham, the North Shore, and Essex County, Massachusetts. For more information about HD Physical Therapy, or to make an appointment today, please call HDPT at 781.587.0776 or visit www.HDPTonline.com.
Wakefield, MA – (June 11, 2013) June is all about celebrating Dad and the men in our lives. What better way to honor those men than by encouraging them to be healthy during Men’s Health Month. The purpose of Men’s Health Month is to heighten the awareness of preventable health issues. This month gives us an opportunity to encourage men and boys to seek regular medical advice and early treatment for disease and injury. 

There are many different fields of physical therapy that can assist all of us with preventative care, health and wellness. Physical therapists specialize in different areas such as orthopedic, geriatric, neurological, cardiovascular, pediatric care, as well as overall health and wellness. A physical therapist does more than treat injuries and disabilities. Physical therapists take a sincere interest in the overall health and wellness of their patients; they focus on preventative care. If you are wondering how physical therapy can help you with preventative care, here are a few reasons why you should seek physical therapy as early on as possible.

See a Physical Therapist Regularly
Just like you schedule a regular check-up with your physician as a preventative measure against illness, the same rule applies to physical therapy. You should schedule a regular check-up with a physical therapist to prevent pain and injury from becoming a chronic problem. A physical therapist can evaluate the status of your health through a detailed evaluation of muscular, skeletal, neurological, cardiovascular and pulmonary systems. If your PT finds a weakness, they will recommend a personalized treatment plan. This prevents problems from getting worse and requiring further treatment. 

Prevent Surgical Treatment
If a physical therapist detects a problem early on, it can be treated with the proper rehabilitation plan preventing you from having surgery. This is another reason why physical therapy is important for preventative care. Not only can it keep you mobile and healthy, it can also save you the expense and time of surgery and medications. 

Maintain Physical Strength
As you age, you lose muscle mass. If you do not engage in a regular exercise/maintenance program, you may end up with a host of mobility problems. A physical therapist can design a treatment plan to help keep you moving, strengthen your muscles and bones, and help you live a high quality life. They key is starting a maintenance program before any problems arise. 

With Direct Access in Massachusetts (which means a person can visit a physical therapist directly to seek a personalized health evaluation), more and more people are using physical therapy for preventative care. This month, encourage the men in your life to seek advice from a physical therapist and to stay healthy. 

For more information about HD Physical Therapy, please stop in, call 781.587.0776 or visit us at www.HDPTonline.com.

Visit Us Tuesday, May 14th 12PM - 7PM

For the celebration of our 1 year anniversary!

607 North Ave, Door16  Wakefield, MA

Join us for food, fun, music, raffles & our very own ice cream truck!

cake.jpg

Wakefield, MA – (April 22, 2013) Spring is finally here; that means warmer weather and spring sports. Though playing sports is a great way for your child to stay fit and healthy, learn about teamwork, make friends, and develop a sense of personal satisfaction, they can also cause injury if not carefully monitored.

According to Safe Kids USA, more than 38 million children and adolescents participate in sports each year in the U.S., and more than 3.5 million of those aged 14 and under receive medical treatment for sports injuries. To help promote sports safety and help prevent injury, HD Physical Therapyrecognizes April as National Youth Sports Safety Month—a national health event initiated by the National Youth Sports Safety Foundation Inc.

Some of the most common sports-related injuries for children include sprains, muscle strains, bone or growth plate injuries, repetitive motion injuries and heat-related illness.  Youth sports injuries may be caused by many factors, including: medical conditions, inadequate physical exams before play, lack of pre-season conditioning, improper equipment, unsafe playing fields/surfaces, improper training or coaching, not warming up, cooling down and stretching properly, playing while injured and poor nutrition, hydration or temperature control. Being aware of these factors, and properly preparing is key to preventing injury.

To further help prevent sport injuries, or to treat an injury that does occur, many children also visit a physical therapist. Your physical therapist can take on many roles—confidante, educator, healer and, in many cases, mediator between a parent and athlete. Parents want their children to be healthy, happy and successful. Kids tend to want to continue playing and not worry about their injury.

“We treat sports injuries in kids of all ages, whether they occur during a high school game, or while playing in the backyard. Regardless, our job is to remind kids that this is youth sports—it’s about the kids learning lifelong lessons about teamwork, having fun and remaining in good health,” says HD Physical Therapy CEO, Ed Harding, PTA. “It’s important to stress that the lifelong risks of ignoring our recommendations far outweigh the short-term benefits of winning a game. Overuse injuries, for example, especially in younger athletes, have long-term consequences that parents and athletes need to recognize. It is important to stress rest and recovery for future success, both on and off the field.“

Wakefield, MA – (March 20, 2013) March is National MS Education and Awareness Month! It is an effort by the Multiple Sclerosis Foundation (MSF) to raise the public's awareness of multiple sclerosis. The vital goals of this campaign are to promote an understanding of the scope of the disease, and to assist those with MS in making educated decisions about their healthcare.

A diagnosis of MS does not necessarily mean that you will experience severe disability. With proper medical and physical therapy management, MS can be viewed as a disease that can be managed over a lifetime. MS is a disease of mobility. PT is indicated for the treatment of mobility deficits; a referral to physical therapy should come as early as possible in the course of the disease, before deficits can become profoundly disabling.

The mobility deficits that are seen in MS are multifactorial. Loss of strength, range of motion, endurance, gait and balance occur as a result of a complex assortment of interacting factors. Physical therapists are uniquely trained to evaluate, assess and treat the mobility deficits that occur in MS.

Physical therapists can help many MS patients with their primary and secondary symptoms. You may lack coordination, feel tired, have involuntary movements, resist movement (spasticity) and have pain. Primary symptoms can then make you move less. As a result, you may experience secondary symptoms like feeling tightness, pain and weakness, especially in the muscles and joints.

“Physical therapy cannot cure primary MS symptoms because, at this time, neurological damage cannot be reversed. However, it can be helpful by providing compensatory treatments. These treatments enable you to compensate for the physical changes brought on by MS; they can include learning new movement techniques, strategies and equipment,” says HDPT co-founder and president, Dr. Glenn D’Addario, MSPT. “The right therapy can be very helpful with decreasing the secondary symptoms of MS. A trained physical therapist can teach you exercises you can use to strengthen and stretch muscles, while maintaining mobility. This can improve your independence and quality of life, and help relieve pain.”

Wakefield Rotarian is raising funds to help end polio 

Wakefield, MA – (February 4, 2013) HD Physical Therapy’s CEO, Ed Harding, PTA, is taking the plunge. Join him for the 3rd Annual Rotary Polar Plunge at the Cape Ann Motor Inn, 33 Rockport Road, Long Beach, Gloucester, MA, this Saturday, February 9th, at 11:30am. Ed is going to jump into the icy Gloucester Ocean, with hundreds of others, to support Rotary International's final push to end polio worldwide.

The number of new polio cases, a disease that once paralyzed more than 1,000 children every day, has dropped more than 99 percent since the 1980s. However, the fight is not over. Polio is a crippling and potentially fatal infectious disease, and for as little as $0.60, a child can be protected against the virus for life. If they do not finish the fight right now, more than 10 million children under the age of five could be paralyzed by polio in the next 40 years.

Rotary, a humanitarian service organization with nearly 34,000 clubs in more than 200 countries and geographical areas, made polio eradication its top priority in 1985.  Rotary has since contributed US$1.2 billion, and its members have logged countless volunteer hours to help immunize more than two billion children in 122 countries.

Your donation will directly support these final immunization campaigns. We are asking you to pledge whatever you can to honor Ed’s plunge, and to help the Wakefield/District 7930 Rotary Club put an end to this infectious disease, once and for all.

“It feels great to be able to directly contribute to the world-wide eradication of polio,” said HDPT’s Ed Harding, PTA. “Even though the polio epidemic of the 1950’s gave rise to the modern field of physical therapy that we practice today, I will be happy when the number of polio-endemic countries in the world is zero, and that the Wakefield Rotarians had a part in making that happen.”

Pledge today and come watch Ed take the plunge! Just $15 pays for 25 doses of the polio vaccine. Ed’s donation page can be found at, http://fndr.se/njYt.

hysical therapists can help you live actively

Wakefield, MA – (January 15, 2013) - We have hit the third week of January, the time when our New Year's resolutions to lose weight and exercise more have probably dwindled. Do not be discouraged, however. Healthy Weight Week, January 20 – 26, celebrates healthy lifestyles that last a lifetime—a welcome antidote to all of the dieting and crazy exercising that typically starts a New Year. This 20th annual celebration is a time for people of all sizes to live actively, eat well and feel good about themselves and others.

Many people already think of physical therapists as the people who help injury or accident victims regain their mobility and heal. However, they often do not think of physical therapists in terms of preventing injury and helping people to live actively.

Many people get lazy or feel too tired to work on their health and fitness goals. Others feel that life just happens to them, and they let things slide. They want to achieve good health and fitness, but life seems to be creating a roadblock to these goals. Plus, if you have some aches and pains, some people believe that exercise could make it worse. Whatever is preventing you from living actively, you do not have to have an injury or illness to consult with a physical therapist regarding your frustrations.

So, during Healthy Weight Week, start thinking about paying a visit to your local physical therapist to help you get on the road to achieve health and wellness. To maintain a healthy lifestyle that lasts a lifetime you have to find what works for you; one size does not fit all. What works for you depends on your current fitness level, personal strengths and skills, limitations, preferences, goals and motivation. Schedule a free screening and let a physical therapist help you to live actively in 2013! 

About HD Physical Therapy

At HDPT we are committed to the health and happiness of our patients. Everyday we work to restore each person's maximal function with consistency and compassion. Offering distinctive, inventive and proven rehabilitation treatment, our devoted professionals strive to deliver a successful and enjoyable experience to every patient we meet. For more information about HD Physical Therapy, or to make an appointment today, please call HDPT at 781.587.0776 or visit www.HDPTonline.com.

We are growing mustaches to change the face of men’s health

Wakefield, MA – (Movember 7, 2012) It’s Movember, the time of year when the mustache takes over the world for one month. Movember is the global men’s health charity that encourages men to grow a mustache for 30 days to raise awareness and funds for men’s health.

HDPT’s co-founding partners, Ed Harding, PTA and Glenn D’Addario, MSPT, DPT are joining the cause this month. Ed and Glenn began their month-long journey clean-shaven and we will be documenting their growth journey on our Facebook page. Follow them at: facebook.com/HDPhysicalTherapy

Why is Movember so important?

  • In 2012, more than 242,000 men will be diagnosed with prostate cancer and more than 28,000 men will die from prostate cancer.
  • One new prostate cancer case occurs every 2.1 minutes.
  • A man dies from prostate cancer every 18.6 minutes.
  • Prostate cancer is the most frequently diagnosed cancer in men after skin cancer.
  • The incidence rates for prostate cancer are significantly higher in African American men.
  • Prostate cancer is the second-leading cause of cancer death in men.
  • 97% of prostate cancer cases occur in men age 50 and older.
  • 1 in 2 men will be diagnosed with cancer in their lifetime, 1 in 3 women will be.
  • 1 in 6 men will be diagnosed with prostate cancer in their lifetime.
  • Testicular cancer is the most common cancer in American males between the ages of 15 and 34.
  • 1 in 270 men will be diagnosed with testicular cancer during their lifetime.

According to Movember.com, each mustache grown generates 2,413 conversations about men’s health in person and online, during November. In 2011, 855,203 people participated in Movember raising $126.3 million for men's health.

This year, HDPT has formed an official team fundraising page to collect donations. Join their team and donate directly at: http://mobro.co/HDPTonline

About Movember
Movember aims to forever change the face of men's health through the power of the mustache, by raising awareness and funds for men’s health initiatives. Since 2003, more than 1.9 million participants have raised over $299MM for the cause, with official Movember campaigns taking place in 21 countries. Movember funds are used to support a broad range of innovative, world-class programs in the areas of awareness, education, survivorship and research. For more information please visit www.movember.com.

About HD Physical Therapy
At HDPT we are committed to the health and happiness of our patients. Everyday we work to restore each person's maximal function with consistency and compassion. Offering distinctive, inventive and proven rehabilitation treatment, our devoted professionals strive to deliver a successful and enjoyable experience to every patient we meet.

HDPT therapists help people stay “FIT AFTER 50”

Wakefield, MA (October 18, 2012) — Happy Physical Therapy Month from HD Physical Therapy! National Physical Therapy Month is hosted by the American Physical Therapy Association. It began in 1992 and is celebrated every October. HDPT supports this year’s outreach initiative directed toward Baby Boomers—Fit After 50. HDPT embraces this unique opportunity to stress the importance of physical therapists, as well as their role in restoring and improving function, and helping patients remain active, fit and mobile.

The physical therapy profession has a proud history. We began as “reconstruction aides” during WWI, assisting the Army with literally “reconstructing” the bodies of wounded and disabled soldiers. With the advent of WWII and the nationwide polio epidemic in the 1940s and 1950s, physical therapists were in high demand.

Today’s physical therapists help people of all ages―from newborns to Baby Boomers―restore and improve motion. At 78 million strong, Baby Boomers are one of the largest and most powerful generations in the U.S. They have redefined aging and are more educated, wealthy and tech savvy than their parents or any generation preceding them. Yet, despite these advantages, some studies show that many Boomers are sedentary, overweight and unhealthy, placing them at greater risk for chronic health conditions such as heart disease, type 2 diabetes and certain cancers.

As we all age, we often lose flexibility, strength and balance, which makes staying fit and healthy after 50 challenging. Working with a physical therapist can help you address these challenges, maintain fitness and avoid injury. To help you achieve these goals, physical therapists take an individual approach and consider any pre-existing conditions or diseases that you may have to tailor a plan that is specific to your unique body and needs.

“Age happens; muscle mass disappears, posture changes and bones become less dense. To stay fit, we need to compensate with a regular exercise routine that includes cardio, strength, balance and stretching,“ says HDPT CEO & co-founder Ed Harding, PTA. “Maintaining a base level of well-rounded fitness is crucial in injury prevention. So, we are thrilled with this month’s opportunity to educate people on the important role physical therapists play in health and wellness for people age 50 and older, as well as how we can keep them active, fit and healthy as they age.”

Physical therapists help people be “fit for life”

Wakefield, MA (September 8, 2012) — Evidence shows that people who stay active are more likely to keep working, engaging in society and enjoying life – and that physical therapists have a vital role in helping them do that at every stage of life. This is the message that thousands of physical therapists are sending out on World Physical Therapy Day.

Every year, physical therapists help millions of people prevent diseases such as heart disease, stroke, diabetes and chronic respiratory disease through recommending safe and appropriate exercise programs. They help people be “Fit for Life” – the theme of this year’s World Physical Therapy Day. Physical therapists also help people manage the effects of these conditions, along with the effects of aging, a wide range of diseases, accidents and the stresses and strains of life.

The message of World Physical Therapy Day is clear. As the movement, physical activity and exercise experts, physical therapists are a vital resource in helping people remain active, happy and productive – all the way from childhood to later life. “Many people do not recognize the contribution PT’s make to keeping people healthy and independent,” said HDPT Co-Founder Dr. Glenn D’Addario, MSPT. “World Physical Therapy Day is an excellent opportunity for us to educate people on exactly what we do.”

What is physical therapy?

Physical Therapy is a health profession that combines the science of healing with the art of caring to treat movement dysfunctions. A physical therapist performs an evaluation of movement, which includes identifying joint dysfunction, tissue limitations, muscular imbalances and structural pathologies. Physical therapists use a variety of methods to create changes in tissue and movement patterns to ultimately restore function. Treatment consists of skilled manual therapy (hands on work) with therapeutic exercise that simulates daily movements to rehabilitate the body, restoring maximal mobility and optimal mechanical motion, as well as provide preventative care.

How do I choose the right PT for me?

Each physical therapist has their own philosophy and approach to patient care. It is influenced by their education, experience, clinical environment and personality. Discover who is practicing in your area, and learn about community reputations. Ask your friends and family members for their recommendations; word of mouth is the best referral. Then ask for a tour of the facility, you should feel comfortable at the clinic and confident that you will receive the best care possible. You will get a sense of your therapist and their style of practice during your initial evaluation.

Can I go wherever I want for my PT treatment?

Yes you can; Massachusetts is a Direct Access state. Direct Access means that you, the patient, has the right to choose your physical therapy provider. Your physician may make recommendations based on the relationship that she or he has with other physical therapy providers, and you have the right to request any provider you wish. If you would like to use HDPT as your physical therapy provider, you may bring your physician prescription to us, and we will be happy to discuss your choice with your physician if appropriate. We work as part of your medical team and have strong relationships with the top physicians and specialists in the Greater Boston and North Shore areas.

About World Physical Therapy Day

World Physical Therapy Day falls on the 8th of September every year, and is an opportunity for physical therapists from all over the world to raise awareness about their crucial role in keeping people well, mobile and independent.

For more information about physical therapy, please call HDPT at 781.587.0776 or visit www.HDPTonline.com.

Wakefield, MA (August 8, 2012) — For millions of children, the return to school also means a return to organized competitive sports. Whether they are playing football, soccer, or cheerleading, the American Association of Neurological Surgeons (AANS), along with HD Physical Therapy (HDPT), continues to stress the importance of concussion awareness and prevention as school-age children head back to their respective fields of play. It is important that children, parents, coaches and administrators all take the proper precautions and are aware of the potentially devastating effects that head and spinal cord injuries can have when participating in these sports. Anyone involved in youth sports must “make concussion awareness a part of your playbook” this August, which is Neurosurgery Outreach Month.

 As many as 3.8 million sports and recreation-related concussions occur in the United States each year. A concussion is an injury that changes how the cells in the brain normally work. Concussions are caused by a hit to the head, and even the body, that forces the brain to move rapidly inside the skull. It does not have to be caused by player-on-player contact, as concussions can result from collisions with the ground, ice or other obstacles. 

To recognize a potential concussion:

  • Watch for a hit or blow to the head, or body, that creates a rapid movement of the head.
  • Pay attention to any change in the athlete’s behavior, awareness, thinking, or functioning of the body. If there appears to be any behavior change in a player, be sure to take the player out of the game and have him/her examined thoroughly

Some potential symptoms that players should be aware of, include:

Headache • Confusion • Difficulty remembering or paying attention • Balance problems or dizziness • Feeling sluggish, hazy, foggy, or groggy • Feeling irritable, more emotional, or “down” • Nausea or vomiting • Bothered by light or noise • Double or blurry vision • Slowed reaction time • Sleep problems • Loss of consciousness.

However, as with most injuries, preventing them is ideal. Buy and use helmets or protective headgear approved by the American Society for Testing Materials International (ASTM) for specific sports 100 percent of the time. The ASTM has vigorous standards for testing helmets for many sports; helmets approved by the ASTM bear a sticker stating this. Helmets and headgear come in many sizes and styles for many sports, and must properly fit to provide maximum protection against head injuries. In addition to other safety apparel or gear, helmets or headgear should be worn at all times for:

  • Baseball and Softball (when batting)
  • Cycling
  • Football
  • Hockey
  • Horseback Riding
  • Inline Skating
  • Powered Recreational Vehicles
  • Skateboards/Scooters
  • Skiing/Snowboarding
  • Wrestling

“Concussion awareness, knowing how to prevent them plus understanding the symptoms of a potential concussion or other traumatic brain injury, is critically important in all sports,” says Ed Harding, PTA, co-founder of HD Physical Therapy. “Helping to educate the public is one of the best weapons we have when it comes to combating these types of injuries. That is why it’s so important to raise awareness in the community and explain just what some of the effects are that these injuries have.”

For more information about concussions, please call HDPT at 781.587.0776.

Wakefield, MA (July 2, 2012) - To celebrate the beginning of Le Tour de France 2012, HD Physical Therapy (HDPT) is sharing some tips on how to prevent common bicycle-related pains and injuries. Whether you are a serious bicyclist or a recreational rider, when it comes to bicycling, you and your bike should fit well together. A proper bike fit minimizes discomfort, increases efficiency and helps prevent pain or injury.

Common Bicycling Pains:

  • Anterior (Front) Knee Pain. Possible causes are having a saddle that is too low, pedaling at a low speed, using your quadriceps muscles too much in pedaling and muscle imbalances in your legs like having strong quadriceps and weak hamstrings.
  • Neck Pain. Possible causes include poor handlebar or saddle position. The handlebar might be too low, at too great a reach, or at too short a reach. A saddle with excessive downward tilt can be a source of neck pain.
  • Lower Back Pain. Possible causes include inflexible hamstrings, low speed, using your quadriceps muscles too much in pedaling, poor back strength and too-long or too-low handle bars.
  • Hamstring Tendinitis. Possible causes are inflexible hamstrings, high saddle or poor hamstring strength.
  • Hand Numbness or Pain. Possible causes are short-reach handlebars, poorly placed brake levers and a downward tilt of the saddle.
  • Foot Numbness or Pain. Possible causes are using quadriceps muscles too much in pedaling, low speed and faulty foot mechanics.
  • Ilio-Tibial Band Tendinitis. Possible causes are too-high saddle and leg length difference.

Physical therapists can evaluate the way your body is positioned on a bike to make sure that your biking style "fits" your functional goals, whether they are for comfort and endurance or for speed and performance. If adjustments and equipment changes need to be made to your bicycle, consider taking it to your local bicycle dealer.

The therapists of HDPT want you to know that equally important to the way you and your bike fit together is your own physical fitness and posture. "Good flexibility of the hamstrings, quadriceps and gluteal muscles is essential seeing they generate the majority of pedaling force and experience a high frequency arc of motion", says Glenn D'Addario, MSPT, DPT, cofounder of HDPT. "Proper stretching, balance and strengthening exercises will help with coordination of bicycling-related skills such as pedaling and maneuvering the bicycle."

For more information about cycling injuries, please call HDPT at 781.587.0776.

Wakefield, MA (June 5, 2012)— Healthy Hands Week, June 4-10, 2012, is a national program sponsored by the American Society of Hand Therapists. Healthy Hands Week brings the benefits of hand therapy to new audiences – demonstrating the advantages of prevention and treatment procedures and educating the public.

Hand therapy is the science of evaluating and treating injuries and conditions of the upper extremity (shoulder, arm, elbow, forearm, wrist and hand). Hand therapy uses a number of therapeutic interventions to help return a person to their highest level of function.

Tennis elbow, characterized by pain, weakness and inflammation of the wrist-extensor tendon that connects to the elbow, is an overuse injury. Tennis isn’t the only predisposing activity, however. Golfers get tennis elbow, as do plumbers, painters, gardeners and accountants.

HD Physical Therapy celebrates Healthy Hands Week by offering the American Society of Hand Therapists tips to prevent hand injuries while playing tennis.

1. Avoid poor body positioning with the elbow leading the racquet.

2. Avoid “wrist flick” motions when striking the ball.

3. Know that a smaller head racquet and/or a tightly strung racquet may require more exertion
    from the forearm musculature.

4. Make sure your grip is not too small. Avoid gripping your racquet too tightly.

5. In order to correct poor body positioning and stroke mechanics, request instruction and/or
    advice from a functional movement professional.

6. Grip size should be chosen by measuring the distance from the crease of your palm to the tip of
    the ring finger.

7. How tight should string tension be? Professionals suggest that the tension be at the
    manufacturer’s lowest recommendation.

8. Try a two-handed backhand to relieve stress placed on the forearm extensor musculature that    
    originates at the elbow. These are the muscles that are contributing to the pain.

9. Try a mid-size to larger head racquet in order to provide a larger impact area or “sweet spot” for
    the ball.

10. As with any activity, stretch and warm up before your match. Ice the area well after your
     match. This will help decrease your chances of inflammation and re-injury.

If you still suffer from pain and weakness in the wrist and elbow, see a therapist. "As part of a tennis elbow rehabilitation program, physical therapy may promote tendon healing, restore normal range of motion and build muscle strength and endurance," says HDPT’s CEO and Co-Founder Ed Harding, PTA. "Tennis elbow recovery time varies with each person and may take several weeks to several months. But, recovery will be faster and more successful when you follow a rehab program that includes appropriate physical therapy."

For more information about preventing tennis elbow, please call HDPT at 781.587.0776.

Wakefield, MA (May 24, 2012)—HD Physical Therapy (HDPT) is joining with the National Osteoporosis Foundation to celebrate National Osteoporosis Month this May. As part of the annual observance, NOF is calling on women and men to start conversations about bone health and family history as the first step to protecting themselves and future generations from osteoporosis.

In the U.S today, about 10 million individuals have osteoporosis and another 34 million have low bone density, placing them at increased risk for osteoporosis and broken bones. In fact, a woman’s risk of breaking a hip is equal to her combined risk of breast, uterine and ovarian cancer. Despite these startling facts, NOF recently surveyed mothers and daughters and found that 94 percent of mothers and daughters admit they are not concerned with osteoporosis as a health condition and only 26 percent have spoken with one another about the disease. With up to one in four men at risk of suffering a broken bone due to osteoporosis, men need to be taking part in these conversations as well.

“Exercise will benefit your bones no matter when you start,” says HDPT’s President and Co-Founder Glenn D’Addario, MSPT, DPT. “However, you'll gain the most benefit if you start exercising regularly and if you continue to exercise throughout your life. At HDPT, we can create a custom exercise program to help you reduce bone loss, improve strength and lower your incidence of falls at any age.”

To help raise awareness and protect future generations from osteoporosis HDPT is joining with the National Osteoporosis Foundation and calling on men and women of all ages to join the conversation by:

  • Talking with family members and loved ones about bone health, calcium, vitamin D, exercise and other ways to prevent osteoporosis;
  • Asking their healthcare provider about their osteoporosis risk factors and when to get a bone density test; and
  • Striving to get enough calcium, vitamin D, and bone healthy exercise everyday.

For more information about osteoporosis, including preventative exercise options, please call HDPT at 781.587.0776.

Official Ribbon Cutting Scheduled for June 11th

Wakefield, MA (May 11, 2012) – HD Physical Therapy (HDPT) opens its first location today at Lakeside Office Park, 607 North Avenue, Door 16, in Wakefield. The mission of HDPT is to be the area leader in outpatient physical therapy.

HDPT unites traditional outpatient, orthopedic physical therapy with the most innovative tools and techniques. HDPT was created based on a total wellness philosophy, individually addressing each patient’s goals and objectives. They get to know you on a personal level, and care immensely about furthering every aspect of your health and wellbeing. Their clinic’s approach to rehabilitation enables you to heal quickly, safely and with more success.

HDPT co-founder, Glenn D’Addario MSPT, DPT, has built a solid reputation throughout the North Shore for delivering exceptional rehabilitative care. He is known for his precise diagnostic abilities, his expert manual skills, his creative treatment approaches and his proven results. HDPT’s founding partner, Edward C. Harding, PTA, has practiced throughout the North Shore for over 10 years. He is recognized for his expert knowledge in functional movement, his incorporation of core training, his inspired treatment plans and his devoted teaching nature.

“We are excited to launch HDPT and offer the highest quality physical therapy services,” said Dr. D’Addario. “The health and happiness of our patients is our number one priority; we are confident that our patients will have a successful and enjoyable experience at our practice.”

HDPT welcomes the public to attend the clinic’s official ribbon cutting on Monday, June 11, 2012, from 10:00AM – 12:00PM. The ribbon cutting and grand opening celebration will include refreshments and demonstrations of services provided by HDPT’s experienced therapists.

HDPT is open from 7:00am – 7:00pm, Monday through Thursday, and 7:00am – 4:00pm on Fridays.  To schedule an appointment, call 781.587.0776; there are no waiting lists for new patients and same day appointments and free injury screenings are available.

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